ERROR LOADING HTML FROM SOURCE (http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu//design/skins/UFDC/html/header_item.html)

The Effects of Direct-to-Consumer Advertising in Prescription Drug Markets

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003600/00001

Material Information

Title: The Effects of Direct-to-Consumer Advertising in Prescription Drug Markets A Theoretical Model and Cost-Benefit Analysis
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Avery, Matthew R.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2006
Publication Date: 2006

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Health Economics
Direct-to-Consumer Advertising
DTCA
Prescription Drugs
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
QALYs
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: In 1997, the FDA lifted regulations regarding the use of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) by prescription drug firms. The ensuing increase in DTCA spending has re-kindled the debate about DTCA's effects on consumer and physician behavior. Critics claim DTCA confuses patients and causes physicians to over-prescribe medication, while proponents claim that its effects are largely informative, encouraging patients to seek treatment. I construct a theoretical model assuming that DTCA has purely market-expanding effects and generate predictions of prescription drug firm behavior, which I then test against empirical data. This model accurately predicts that firms with the largest market share will do the bulk of the advertising within a market and outlines conditions under which firms will coordinate their advertising. I also conduct a cost-benefit analysis of DTCA, demonstrating that the societal gains in Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) resulting from DTCA far outweigh the costs of advertising, consumed physician time, and QALY losses from side effects. These findings are robust under almost any rate of mis-prescription. Thus, I conclude that the behavior of prescription drug firms is consistent with a purely market-expanding effect from DTCA and that DTCA's effect on society is largely positive, with its benefits far outweighing its costs.
Statement of Responsibility: by Matthew R. Avery
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2006
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Coe, Richard

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2006 A9
System ID: NCFE003600:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003600/00001

Material Information

Title: The Effects of Direct-to-Consumer Advertising in Prescription Drug Markets A Theoretical Model and Cost-Benefit Analysis
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Avery, Matthew R.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2006
Publication Date: 2006

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Health Economics
Direct-to-Consumer Advertising
DTCA
Prescription Drugs
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
QALYs
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: In 1997, the FDA lifted regulations regarding the use of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) by prescription drug firms. The ensuing increase in DTCA spending has re-kindled the debate about DTCA's effects on consumer and physician behavior. Critics claim DTCA confuses patients and causes physicians to over-prescribe medication, while proponents claim that its effects are largely informative, encouraging patients to seek treatment. I construct a theoretical model assuming that DTCA has purely market-expanding effects and generate predictions of prescription drug firm behavior, which I then test against empirical data. This model accurately predicts that firms with the largest market share will do the bulk of the advertising within a market and outlines conditions under which firms will coordinate their advertising. I also conduct a cost-benefit analysis of DTCA, demonstrating that the societal gains in Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) resulting from DTCA far outweigh the costs of advertising, consumed physician time, and QALY losses from side effects. These findings are robust under almost any rate of mis-prescription. Thus, I conclude that the behavior of prescription drug firms is consistent with a purely market-expanding effect from DTCA and that DTCA's effect on society is largely positive, with its benefits far outweighing its costs.
Statement of Responsibility: by Matthew R. Avery
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2006
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Coe, Richard

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2006 A9
System ID: NCFE003600:00001

ERROR LOADING HTML FROM SOURCE (http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu//design/skins/UFDC/html/footer_item.html)