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Romantic History and the Historical Novel

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003575/00001

Material Information

Title: Romantic History and the Historical Novel
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Stein, Dwayne
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Historical Novel
Romantic History
Fiction vs. Historical Narration
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The genre of the historical novel occupies an interesting place in literature. It is valued both as history and fiction, even though these would seem to be contradictory terms. This thesis begins by examining the differences and similarities between academic history and fictional narration--using the French Revolution as an example. Next it traces the path that leads from history to historical fiction, including authors such as Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine. The concept of 'Romantic history' is discussed, exemplified by Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution: A History. Then specific examples of the genre of the historical novel are discussed. The texts are: Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities, Victor Hugo, Ninety-Three, Stendhal, The Red and the Black, and Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace. In the end, this thesis argues that both history and historical fiction occupy separate but valuable positions in historical discourse. Academic history allows the reader to delve into the specific facts of a moment, and historical fiction allows the reader to feel like he or she is a part of the moment. When read together, they portray a fuller picture of a particular historical moment as part of a metahistorical perspective.
Statement of Responsibility: by Dwayne Stein
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Wallace, Miriam

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 S8
System ID: NCFE003575:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003575/00001

Material Information

Title: Romantic History and the Historical Novel
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Stein, Dwayne
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Historical Novel
Romantic History
Fiction vs. Historical Narration
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The genre of the historical novel occupies an interesting place in literature. It is valued both as history and fiction, even though these would seem to be contradictory terms. This thesis begins by examining the differences and similarities between academic history and fictional narration--using the French Revolution as an example. Next it traces the path that leads from history to historical fiction, including authors such as Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine. The concept of 'Romantic history' is discussed, exemplified by Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution: A History. Then specific examples of the genre of the historical novel are discussed. The texts are: Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities, Victor Hugo, Ninety-Three, Stendhal, The Red and the Black, and Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace. In the end, this thesis argues that both history and historical fiction occupy separate but valuable positions in historical discourse. Academic history allows the reader to delve into the specific facts of a moment, and historical fiction allows the reader to feel like he or she is a part of the moment. When read together, they portray a fuller picture of a particular historical moment as part of a metahistorical perspective.
Statement of Responsibility: by Dwayne Stein
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Wallace, Miriam

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 S8
System ID: NCFE003575:00001

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