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Sniffing Out the Big One

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003564/00001

Material Information

Title: Sniffing Out the Big One
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Roux, Amber
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Nile Monitors
Invasive Species
Conservation
Ecology
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Invasion biology is a relatively new field of study, yet the importance of understanding the causes and processes of the invasion of exotic species is evident. Global travel and international trade assist the dispersal of species around the globe while humans do not entirely understand the consequences of these actions. Exotic species become established in foreign environments and detrimental impacts to native systems have occurred, but they are too recent to reveal the complete nature of this process in an evolving world. It is obvious, however, that introductions of exotic species are unpredictable and can have severe consequences. Learning how to predict which species are most harmful will be an important advancement for invasion biology, but until predictions are reliable, it is necessary to respond to invading species rapidly and effectively. The Nile monitor, Varanus niloticus (L.) has recently become established in Cape Coral, Florida. This species is expected to spread quickly and have a detrimental impact on native wildlife. Several wildlife refuges near Cape Coral are at risk of invasion within the next year, and several threatened species may be caused to become extinct locally by the introduction of monitors to the preserves. Detection dog programs have been created to facilitate management of exotic species, and have proven to be successful and cost-effective. This thesis investigates the notion of creating a Nile monitor detection program to aid in the research and subsequent eradication of V. niloticus from Southwest Florida. A Nile monitor detection program would be the first of its kind in the United States and a significant advancement for conservation and environmental management.
Statement of Responsibility: by Amber Roux
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Lowman, Margaret

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 R8
System ID: NCFE003564:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003564/00001

Material Information

Title: Sniffing Out the Big One
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Roux, Amber
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Nile Monitors
Invasive Species
Conservation
Ecology
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Invasion biology is a relatively new field of study, yet the importance of understanding the causes and processes of the invasion of exotic species is evident. Global travel and international trade assist the dispersal of species around the globe while humans do not entirely understand the consequences of these actions. Exotic species become established in foreign environments and detrimental impacts to native systems have occurred, but they are too recent to reveal the complete nature of this process in an evolving world. It is obvious, however, that introductions of exotic species are unpredictable and can have severe consequences. Learning how to predict which species are most harmful will be an important advancement for invasion biology, but until predictions are reliable, it is necessary to respond to invading species rapidly and effectively. The Nile monitor, Varanus niloticus (L.) has recently become established in Cape Coral, Florida. This species is expected to spread quickly and have a detrimental impact on native wildlife. Several wildlife refuges near Cape Coral are at risk of invasion within the next year, and several threatened species may be caused to become extinct locally by the introduction of monitors to the preserves. Detection dog programs have been created to facilitate management of exotic species, and have proven to be successful and cost-effective. This thesis investigates the notion of creating a Nile monitor detection program to aid in the research and subsequent eradication of V. niloticus from Southwest Florida. A Nile monitor detection program would be the first of its kind in the United States and a significant advancement for conservation and environmental management.
Statement of Responsibility: by Amber Roux
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Lowman, Margaret

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 R8
System ID: NCFE003564:00001

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