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Trophic Dynamics of Zooplankton and Myctophid Fish in the Central Pacific Ocean

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003562/00001

Material Information

Title: Trophic Dynamics of Zooplankton and Myctophid Fish in the Central Pacific Ocean
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Rodgers, Erin
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Zooplankton
Myctophids
Trophic Dynamics
Carbon Cycle
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: New studies have been carried out concerning the importance of the ocean as a carbon dioxide sink. Carbon dioxide sinks are created by the primary production of phytoplankton and respiration of zooplankton in consuming the phytoplankton. In a secondary step of the process of sink creation, carbon is being sequestered in the deep benthic layers of the ocean by myctophid fish. These fish range throughout the Atlantic and Pacific and are instrumental in this sequestering process as they vertically migrate between surface and 300m depth in feeding upon the movements of zooplankton which migrate to the surface at night as well. Such migrations create a unique food web dynamic in which limiting control comes from the top as well as the bottom of the food chain. Data were collected on a research vessel in the Central Pacific Ocean between the latitudes of 0� and 20oN. Zooplankton and myctophid populations were sampled at different times of day at 35 stations across these latitudes. The collected data show population increases in the inter-tropical convergence zone and decreases in diversity towards land. These trends represent a dynamic controlled by both bottom-up and top down mechanisms. Food web modeling has posed many problems that are yet unresolved, especially with fundamentally different organisms. Areas of potentially greater CO2 sequestration are also identified across latitude based on web dynamics. Oceanic carbon dioxide sinks have a powerful impact by greatly decreasing anthropogenic carbon levels in the global atmosphere which regulate climate cycles and global warming trends.
Statement of Responsibility: by Erin Rodgers
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Beulig, Alfred

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 R6
System ID: NCFE003562:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003562/00001

Material Information

Title: Trophic Dynamics of Zooplankton and Myctophid Fish in the Central Pacific Ocean
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Rodgers, Erin
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Zooplankton
Myctophids
Trophic Dynamics
Carbon Cycle
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: New studies have been carried out concerning the importance of the ocean as a carbon dioxide sink. Carbon dioxide sinks are created by the primary production of phytoplankton and respiration of zooplankton in consuming the phytoplankton. In a secondary step of the process of sink creation, carbon is being sequestered in the deep benthic layers of the ocean by myctophid fish. These fish range throughout the Atlantic and Pacific and are instrumental in this sequestering process as they vertically migrate between surface and 300m depth in feeding upon the movements of zooplankton which migrate to the surface at night as well. Such migrations create a unique food web dynamic in which limiting control comes from the top as well as the bottom of the food chain. Data were collected on a research vessel in the Central Pacific Ocean between the latitudes of 0� and 20oN. Zooplankton and myctophid populations were sampled at different times of day at 35 stations across these latitudes. The collected data show population increases in the inter-tropical convergence zone and decreases in diversity towards land. These trends represent a dynamic controlled by both bottom-up and top down mechanisms. Food web modeling has posed many problems that are yet unresolved, especially with fundamentally different organisms. Areas of potentially greater CO2 sequestration are also identified across latitude based on web dynamics. Oceanic carbon dioxide sinks have a powerful impact by greatly decreasing anthropogenic carbon levels in the global atmosphere which regulate climate cycles and global warming trends.
Statement of Responsibility: by Erin Rodgers
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Beulig, Alfred

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 R6
System ID: NCFE003562:00001

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