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Off with Their Heads!'

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003559/00001

Material Information

Title: Off with Their Heads!' Judith and Salome Revisited an Iconographical Study of Biblical Decapitations from the Medieval to Modern Periods
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Renes, Elizabeth
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Biblical Women
Book of Judith
Salome
John the Baptist
Deception
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The iconographical study of both Judith and Salome has brought to light many explanations for the degeneration of their imagery. The most important, however, concerns the presence, or lack of, a religious narrative. In the Medieval period, where the images were used to convey a religious message, Judith and Salome depictions were a direct representation of their Biblical stories. As long as the Biblical text was followed without deviation, images of Judith depict a woman that is pious and heroic, while Salome is seen as a dancing girl who brings about Christ's mission through the death of John the Baptist. This changes, however, as art progresses to reflect the Renaissance's emphasis on the individual. Judith and Salome images begin to depart from the Biblical narrative, and focus on presenting the women in a manner similar to a portrait. By placing these women alone, their status as important religious figures in negated, and they become simply a woman with a decapitated head. Without a narrative, it becomes easy for social misogyny to misinterpret these women. They become women who have caused the decapitation of a man, and by the 19th century, this idea of the femme fatale fully supports the period's decedent views towards women's sexuality.
Statement of Responsibility: by Elizabeth Renes
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Hassold, Cris

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 R4
System ID: NCFE003559:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003559/00001

Material Information

Title: Off with Their Heads!' Judith and Salome Revisited an Iconographical Study of Biblical Decapitations from the Medieval to Modern Periods
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Renes, Elizabeth
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Biblical Women
Book of Judith
Salome
John the Baptist
Deception
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The iconographical study of both Judith and Salome has brought to light many explanations for the degeneration of their imagery. The most important, however, concerns the presence, or lack of, a religious narrative. In the Medieval period, where the images were used to convey a religious message, Judith and Salome depictions were a direct representation of their Biblical stories. As long as the Biblical text was followed without deviation, images of Judith depict a woman that is pious and heroic, while Salome is seen as a dancing girl who brings about Christ's mission through the death of John the Baptist. This changes, however, as art progresses to reflect the Renaissance's emphasis on the individual. Judith and Salome images begin to depart from the Biblical narrative, and focus on presenting the women in a manner similar to a portrait. By placing these women alone, their status as important religious figures in negated, and they become simply a woman with a decapitated head. Without a narrative, it becomes easy for social misogyny to misinterpret these women. They become women who have caused the decapitation of a man, and by the 19th century, this idea of the femme fatale fully supports the period's decedent views towards women's sexuality.
Statement of Responsibility: by Elizabeth Renes
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Hassold, Cris

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 R4
System ID: NCFE003559:00001

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