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Many are Called

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003553/00001

Material Information

Title: Many are Called Rastafari and the 'Rent-A-Dread Problem'
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Onnie-Hay, Julia
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Rastafarianism
Jamaica
Tourism
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: RastafarI is a livity (spiritual culture) of resistance to Babylon (European American neocolonialism) emerging from an African-Jamaican tradition of resistance to colonial subordination. Through two months of ethnographic research in Jamaica, I observed the routinization of a pattern of romantic/sexual relationships between African-Jamaican hustlers who identify as RastafarI in outward appearance and word (rent-a-dreads or rentas) and tourist women (renters). RastafarI identify rentas as a type of 'wolf in sheep clothing.' In this thesis, I write that renta identity can be understood as a modern, cultural petit marronage, in which rentas behave in a liminal state of professed resistance and lived accommodation of Babylon. This routinization of renta/renter relations is seen by RastafarI as a contribution to the larger problem of misrepresentation. I explore how rentas seek to transcend their subordinate positions in the Babylonian socioeconomic hierarchy through romantic/sexual relationships with renters and how renta/renter relations fail outside of the liminal tourist space, reinforcing the Babylonian positions. The significance of the 'renta problem' to RastafarI is found in the proverb, 'many are called, few are chosen.' RastafarI indicate that the attraction of diverse peoples to the livity is part of the gradual fulfillment of the prophecy: 'Babylon is falling!'
Statement of Responsibility: by Julia Onnie-Hay
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Supplements: Accompanying materials: Includes 3 Flyers.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Vesperi, Maria

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 O5
System ID: NCFE003553:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003553/00001

Material Information

Title: Many are Called Rastafari and the 'Rent-A-Dread Problem'
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Onnie-Hay, Julia
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Rastafarianism
Jamaica
Tourism
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: RastafarI is a livity (spiritual culture) of resistance to Babylon (European American neocolonialism) emerging from an African-Jamaican tradition of resistance to colonial subordination. Through two months of ethnographic research in Jamaica, I observed the routinization of a pattern of romantic/sexual relationships between African-Jamaican hustlers who identify as RastafarI in outward appearance and word (rent-a-dreads or rentas) and tourist women (renters). RastafarI identify rentas as a type of 'wolf in sheep clothing.' In this thesis, I write that renta identity can be understood as a modern, cultural petit marronage, in which rentas behave in a liminal state of professed resistance and lived accommodation of Babylon. This routinization of renta/renter relations is seen by RastafarI as a contribution to the larger problem of misrepresentation. I explore how rentas seek to transcend their subordinate positions in the Babylonian socioeconomic hierarchy through romantic/sexual relationships with renters and how renta/renter relations fail outside of the liminal tourist space, reinforcing the Babylonian positions. The significance of the 'renta problem' to RastafarI is found in the proverb, 'many are called, few are chosen.' RastafarI indicate that the attraction of diverse peoples to the livity is part of the gradual fulfillment of the prophecy: 'Babylon is falling!'
Statement of Responsibility: by Julia Onnie-Hay
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Supplements: Accompanying materials: Includes 3 Flyers.
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Vesperi, Maria

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 O5
System ID: NCFE003553:00001

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