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Visions and Revisions

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003550/00001

Material Information

Title: Visions and Revisions Women's Identity in Early Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Art
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Newman, Anne Marie
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Eighteenth Century
British Literature
British Art
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis examines representations of female identity constructed in early eighteenth-century British literature and art. Authors Haywood, Manley and Defoe all wrote stories of disgraced women who construct empowered identities by manipulating the sexual economics of their situations to gain power over the men who scorned them. Their fiction reflected the concerns and actions of contemporary women such as Lady Mary Wortley Montagu. During the 1730s, art and literature expressed increasingly middling-class values and emphasized female virtue. William Hogarth's conversation pieces showed the family as an affectionately bonded unit while his prints attacked aristocratic vices. Conduct books and arguments for women's education furthered the idea that women were naturally virtuous. Samuel Richardson's Pamela was first novel to embrace the domestic ideal. Pamela refuses to take part in the aristocratic system in which her sexuality has currency and insists on being valued for her personal merits. While the heroines of the first chapter exercised their power through revenge, the power that the domestic woman gains is that of reformation.
Statement of Responsibility: by Anne Marie Newman
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Wallace, Miriam

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 N5
System ID: NCFE003550:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003550/00001

Material Information

Title: Visions and Revisions Women's Identity in Early Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Art
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Newman, Anne Marie
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Eighteenth Century
British Literature
British Art
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis examines representations of female identity constructed in early eighteenth-century British literature and art. Authors Haywood, Manley and Defoe all wrote stories of disgraced women who construct empowered identities by manipulating the sexual economics of their situations to gain power over the men who scorned them. Their fiction reflected the concerns and actions of contemporary women such as Lady Mary Wortley Montagu. During the 1730s, art and literature expressed increasingly middling-class values and emphasized female virtue. William Hogarth's conversation pieces showed the family as an affectionately bonded unit while his prints attacked aristocratic vices. Conduct books and arguments for women's education furthered the idea that women were naturally virtuous. Samuel Richardson's Pamela was first novel to embrace the domestic ideal. Pamela refuses to take part in the aristocratic system in which her sexuality has currency and insists on being valued for her personal merits. While the heroines of the first chapter exercised their power through revenge, the power that the domestic woman gains is that of reformation.
Statement of Responsibility: by Anne Marie Newman
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Wallace, Miriam

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 N5
System ID: NCFE003550:00001

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