ERROR LOADING HTML FROM SOURCE (http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu//design/skins/UFDC/html/header_item.html)

The Poetics of the Double-Bind

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003541/00001

Material Information

Title: The Poetics of the Double-Bind Gender and Creative Agency in Anne Sexton, Adrienne Rich, and Denise Levertov
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: McHugh, Megan
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Petrarchan Revisionism
Women Poets
Lyric Tradition
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis uses the work of three women poets of the twentieth century to explore problems of gender and creative agency in the Western poetic tradition. I often refer to the paradigm of male/poet/subject in address to a woman/beloved/object, typified by Petrarchan sonnet sequences of the Renaissance, in order to both focus the discussion on specific problems of gender and lyric address and to exemplify the problem of the 'double bind.' This term, coined by Suzanne Juhasz and central to my thesis, is meant to signify the socially-constructed inconsistencies between the positions of poet and woman. I discuss three women poets of the twentieth century -- Anne Sexton, Adrienne Rich, and Denise Levertov -- and explore the ways their personal conception of the double bind informs their poetry. I examine how they transform the lyric address of a poet/subject to a beloved/object into a lyric that is more aware of the problems of representational language and sexism found in Petrarchan sequences. Anne Sexton utilizes the poet's address to a beloved to display her speaker's melancholic attachment to normative gender positioning she otherwise criticizes in her work. Adrienne Rich takes on the tendencies of objectification inherent within Petrarchan address in order to articulate lesbian subjectivity in 'Twenty-One Love Poems.' Denise Levertov demonstrates her interest in the problems of subject/object relations in order to develop a theory of ethical presence.
Statement of Responsibility: by Megan McHugh
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Lee, Benjamin

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 M15
System ID: NCFE003541:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003541/00001

Material Information

Title: The Poetics of the Double-Bind Gender and Creative Agency in Anne Sexton, Adrienne Rich, and Denise Levertov
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: McHugh, Megan
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Petrarchan Revisionism
Women Poets
Lyric Tradition
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis uses the work of three women poets of the twentieth century to explore problems of gender and creative agency in the Western poetic tradition. I often refer to the paradigm of male/poet/subject in address to a woman/beloved/object, typified by Petrarchan sonnet sequences of the Renaissance, in order to both focus the discussion on specific problems of gender and lyric address and to exemplify the problem of the 'double bind.' This term, coined by Suzanne Juhasz and central to my thesis, is meant to signify the socially-constructed inconsistencies between the positions of poet and woman. I discuss three women poets of the twentieth century -- Anne Sexton, Adrienne Rich, and Denise Levertov -- and explore the ways their personal conception of the double bind informs their poetry. I examine how they transform the lyric address of a poet/subject to a beloved/object into a lyric that is more aware of the problems of representational language and sexism found in Petrarchan sequences. Anne Sexton utilizes the poet's address to a beloved to display her speaker's melancholic attachment to normative gender positioning she otherwise criticizes in her work. Adrienne Rich takes on the tendencies of objectification inherent within Petrarchan address in order to articulate lesbian subjectivity in 'Twenty-One Love Poems.' Denise Levertov demonstrates her interest in the problems of subject/object relations in order to develop a theory of ethical presence.
Statement of Responsibility: by Megan McHugh
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Lee, Benjamin

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 M15
System ID: NCFE003541:00001

ERROR LOADING HTML FROM SOURCE (http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu//design/skins/UFDC/html/footer_item.html)