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Hear Say

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003524/00001

Material Information

Title: Hear Say Identity, Communication, and Language in the Modern Metaplay or Adventures in Playwriting
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Holder, Emma
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Metadrama
Metatheatre
Albee, Edward
Shepard, Sam
Play Production
Playwriting
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis attempts to do three things. The first is to discuss the importance of metatheatre and the conscious use of metatheatrical techniques in modem theatre. This thesis argues that metaplays, in highlighting the constructed nature of drama, confront their audience and make them think about how they perceive drama. I argue that this encourages the audience to reexamine the world around them as well. In the first chapter, I discuss how metatheatre works towards these ends in Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and Sam Shepard's Action particularly in respect to the formation of identity, the use of language, and communication between the characters as well as between the play and its audience. The second component of this thesis is the script of the play, Elvis is Dead. This play was performed at New College on March 10, 11, and 12, 2005. Elvis is Dead is my own attempt to explore the ideas that I discuss in chapter one. It also explores how media and culture in general affect identity and communication. The third component of this thesis is a discussion of the production process. While focusing slightly on theories of directing, I also discuss Brecht's influence on my production and the relationship between the production and the theoretical background for this thesis.
Statement of Responsibility: by Emma Holder
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Moore, John; Myhill, Nova

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 H7
System ID: NCFE003524:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003524/00001

Material Information

Title: Hear Say Identity, Communication, and Language in the Modern Metaplay or Adventures in Playwriting
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Holder, Emma
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Metadrama
Metatheatre
Albee, Edward
Shepard, Sam
Play Production
Playwriting
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis attempts to do three things. The first is to discuss the importance of metatheatre and the conscious use of metatheatrical techniques in modem theatre. This thesis argues that metaplays, in highlighting the constructed nature of drama, confront their audience and make them think about how they perceive drama. I argue that this encourages the audience to reexamine the world around them as well. In the first chapter, I discuss how metatheatre works towards these ends in Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and Sam Shepard's Action particularly in respect to the formation of identity, the use of language, and communication between the characters as well as between the play and its audience. The second component of this thesis is the script of the play, Elvis is Dead. This play was performed at New College on March 10, 11, and 12, 2005. Elvis is Dead is my own attempt to explore the ideas that I discuss in chapter one. It also explores how media and culture in general affect identity and communication. The third component of this thesis is a discussion of the production process. While focusing slightly on theories of directing, I also discuss Brecht's influence on my production and the relationship between the production and the theoretical background for this thesis.
Statement of Responsibility: by Emma Holder
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Moore, John; Myhill, Nova

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 H7
System ID: NCFE003524:00001

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