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Shucking Oysters

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003513/00001

Material Information

Title: Shucking Oysters Community and Environment on Apalachicola Bay
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Ginsburg, Laura
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Community
Environment
Apalachicola Bay
Oysters
Place
Attachment
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The small Eastpoint oystering community on Apalachicola Bay in north Florida has historically depended on the catch and sale of oysters and other seafood products to sustain its social and economic livelihood, with a large percentage of individuals within the community employed in jobs that relate directly to oysters. Over the past several years this community has been under threat from expanding development and a real estate explosion, as well as degrading environmental conditions from higher pollution rates and a multi-state water allocation battle. This thesis explores the concepts of community relation to place and the environment, specifically those relationships found within natural resource based communities, and investigates the historic reliance and the present relationship of people in the community to the resource. Specific data that were collected from the oystermen themselves, as well as other community members and policy makers, through open-ended interviews. The changing structure of the community due to development, tightening governmental restrictions on the oyster trade, and changing environmental conditions are major aspects of the decline of the community. Despite these findings, this research shows that attachment to the community and the environment, in the sense of working on the water, are still strong and remain important to community members. This community highlights the need to preserve places that have a strong heritage in order to more fully understand the relationship of people to place and remind us of what community really can be, as well as underlining the importance of working with the environment to sustain a living.
Statement of Responsibility: by Laura Ginsburg
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Brain, David

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 G4
System ID: NCFE003513:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003513/00001

Material Information

Title: Shucking Oysters Community and Environment on Apalachicola Bay
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Ginsburg, Laura
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Community
Environment
Apalachicola Bay
Oysters
Place
Attachment
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The small Eastpoint oystering community on Apalachicola Bay in north Florida has historically depended on the catch and sale of oysters and other seafood products to sustain its social and economic livelihood, with a large percentage of individuals within the community employed in jobs that relate directly to oysters. Over the past several years this community has been under threat from expanding development and a real estate explosion, as well as degrading environmental conditions from higher pollution rates and a multi-state water allocation battle. This thesis explores the concepts of community relation to place and the environment, specifically those relationships found within natural resource based communities, and investigates the historic reliance and the present relationship of people in the community to the resource. Specific data that were collected from the oystermen themselves, as well as other community members and policy makers, through open-ended interviews. The changing structure of the community due to development, tightening governmental restrictions on the oyster trade, and changing environmental conditions are major aspects of the decline of the community. Despite these findings, this research shows that attachment to the community and the environment, in the sense of working on the water, are still strong and remain important to community members. This community highlights the need to preserve places that have a strong heritage in order to more fully understand the relationship of people to place and remind us of what community really can be, as well as underlining the importance of working with the environment to sustain a living.
Statement of Responsibility: by Laura Ginsburg
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Brain, David

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 G4
System ID: NCFE003513:00001

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