ERROR LOADING HTML FROM SOURCE (http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu//design/skins/UFDC/html/header_item.html)

Bromeliad Tank Ecosystems and Other Container Habitats in the Florida Everglades

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003508/00001

Material Information

Title: Bromeliad Tank Ecosystems and Other Container Habitats in the Florida Everglades
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Fallon, Candace
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Bromeliads
Phytotelmata
Tree Frogs
Anthropods
Everglades
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The role of Bromeliaceae as a microhabitat was investigated in Florida's Everglades National Park during the months of February, March, and April 2005. Many bromeliads form watertight tanks, or phytotelmata, that become microhabitats for other plants and animals. In order to research this use in the dry winter months, bromeliad tanks were simulated using plastic cups. Three sites were chosen for this study: two mangrove sites (Sites 1 and 2) and a hardwood hammock site (Site 3). Sites 1 and 3 each contained six study trees. Site 2 only had three trees. Eighteen cups were set up on each tree, at two different heights, for a total of nine cups at each height. Water was poured into each cup and every two weeks three cups from each height on each tree was collected and brought back to the lab for observation, identification, and counting of the fauna associated with them. A total of 1,312 organisms were counted over the six week study period. The orders Diptera, Hymenoptera, and Psocoptera, and the class Arachnida, were the most represented groups among all three sites. The hardwood hammock contained the highest number of organisms. No significant trends were noticed among tree species, cup heights, or weeks. Nonetheless, this study indicates that container habitats play important roles within larger ecosystems and can support a wide range of fauna. Further research will aid in the conservation of these keystone species.
Statement of Responsibility: by Candace Fallon
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Lowman, Margaret

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 F1
System ID: NCFE003508:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003508/00001

Material Information

Title: Bromeliad Tank Ecosystems and Other Container Habitats in the Florida Everglades
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Fallon, Candace
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2005
Publication Date: 2005

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Bromeliads
Phytotelmata
Tree Frogs
Anthropods
Everglades
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The role of Bromeliaceae as a microhabitat was investigated in Florida's Everglades National Park during the months of February, March, and April 2005. Many bromeliads form watertight tanks, or phytotelmata, that become microhabitats for other plants and animals. In order to research this use in the dry winter months, bromeliad tanks were simulated using plastic cups. Three sites were chosen for this study: two mangrove sites (Sites 1 and 2) and a hardwood hammock site (Site 3). Sites 1 and 3 each contained six study trees. Site 2 only had three trees. Eighteen cups were set up on each tree, at two different heights, for a total of nine cups at each height. Water was poured into each cup and every two weeks three cups from each height on each tree was collected and brought back to the lab for observation, identification, and counting of the fauna associated with them. A total of 1,312 organisms were counted over the six week study period. The orders Diptera, Hymenoptera, and Psocoptera, and the class Arachnida, were the most represented groups among all three sites. The hardwood hammock contained the highest number of organisms. No significant trends were noticed among tree species, cup heights, or weeks. Nonetheless, this study indicates that container habitats play important roles within larger ecosystems and can support a wide range of fauna. Further research will aid in the conservation of these keystone species.
Statement of Responsibility: by Candace Fallon
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Lowman, Margaret

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2005 F1
System ID: NCFE003508:00001

ERROR LOADING HTML FROM SOURCE (http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu//design/skins/UFDC/html/footer_item.html)