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No Room in Our Imaginations? Small Towns, Social Crises and Spaces of Possibility in Short Stories by Arguedas and Garci...

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Material Information

Title:
No Room in Our Imaginations? Small Towns, Social Crises and Spaces of Possibility in Short Stories by Arguedas and Garcia Marquez
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Blasco, Erin Marie
Publisher:
New College of Florida
Place of Publication:
Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date:
2005
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Bachelor's ( B.A.)
Degree Grantor:
New College of Florida
Degree Divisions:
Humanities
Degree Disciplines:
Hispanic Language and Literature
Committee Members:
Portugal, Jose Alberto

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Liminal
Community
Ritual
Rite
Small Town
Rural
Ruralism
Marquez, Gabriel
Arguedas
Cortazar
Latin American Literature
Short Stories
'A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings'
'The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World'
Liminoid
Liminality
Communitas
Genre:
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )

Notes

Abstract:
This thesis is an exploration of the representations of Latin American small towns in three short stories. I approach them from a perspective emphasizing social crisis and responses to problems that threaten to unravel their social fabrics. I argue that effective responses to crisis come in the form of symbolic actions that open up spaces of possibility during chaos and confusion. These actions transform towns into communities by stabilizing meaning and developing a communal sense of identity. In Chapter One, I introduce the three towns through their social landscapes. I also situate each town within the authors' 'fictive worlds,' which I imagine as populated by towns that appear in other stories. Chapter Two is a detailed exploration of the Andean village where 'La muerte de los Arango' ('The Death of the Arango Brothers') by Jose Maria Arguedas takes place. This town has an outbreak of the plague which threatens its social structure. Two stories by Gabriel Garcia Marquez are discussed in Chapter Three: 'Un senor muy viejo con unas alas enormes' ('A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings') and 'EI ahogado mas hermoso del mundo' ('The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World'). Both of these towns are intruded upon by strangers that challenge their societies and both attempt to address these problems through the enactment of rites. I conclude that paying attention to social crisis allows readers to become more connected with the represented societies with which they are wholly unfamiliar. Readers both witness and participate in the towns' attempts to play with meaning and cause this moment of possibility to continue beyond the borders of the narration and into the readers' space.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Erin Marie Blasco
Thesis:
Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
General Note:
RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
General Note:
Faculty Sponsor: Portugal, Jose Alberto

Record Information

Source Institution:
New College of Florida
Holding Location:
New College of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
local - S.T. 2005 B64
System ID:
NCFE003478:00001

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
No Room in Our Imaginations? Small Towns, Social Crises and Spaces of Possibility in Short Stories by Arguedas and Garcia Marquez
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Blasco, Erin Marie
Publisher:
New College of Florida
Place of Publication:
Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date:
2005
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Bachelor's ( B.A.)
Degree Grantor:
New College of Florida
Degree Divisions:
Humanities
Degree Disciplines:
Hispanic Language and Literature
Committee Members:
Portugal, Jose Alberto

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Liminal
Community
Ritual
Rite
Small Town
Rural
Ruralism
Marquez, Gabriel
Arguedas
Cortazar
Latin American Literature
Short Stories
'A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings'
'The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World'
Liminoid
Liminality
Communitas
Genre:
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )

Notes

Abstract:
This thesis is an exploration of the representations of Latin American small towns in three short stories. I approach them from a perspective emphasizing social crisis and responses to problems that threaten to unravel their social fabrics. I argue that effective responses to crisis come in the form of symbolic actions that open up spaces of possibility during chaos and confusion. These actions transform towns into communities by stabilizing meaning and developing a communal sense of identity. In Chapter One, I introduce the three towns through their social landscapes. I also situate each town within the authors' 'fictive worlds,' which I imagine as populated by towns that appear in other stories. Chapter Two is a detailed exploration of the Andean village where 'La muerte de los Arango' ('The Death of the Arango Brothers') by Jose Maria Arguedas takes place. This town has an outbreak of the plague which threatens its social structure. Two stories by Gabriel Garcia Marquez are discussed in Chapter Three: 'Un senor muy viejo con unas alas enormes' ('A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings') and 'EI ahogado mas hermoso del mundo' ('The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World'). Both of these towns are intruded upon by strangers that challenge their societies and both attempt to address these problems through the enactment of rites. I conclude that paying attention to social crisis allows readers to become more connected with the represented societies with which they are wholly unfamiliar. Readers both witness and participate in the towns' attempts to play with meaning and cause this moment of possibility to continue beyond the borders of the narration and into the readers' space.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Erin Marie Blasco
Thesis:
Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2005
General Note:
RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
General Note:
Faculty Sponsor: Portugal, Jose Alberto

Record Information

Source Institution:
New College of Florida
Holding Location:
New College of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
local - S.T. 2005 B64
System ID:
NCFE003478:00001

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