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Recovering the Landscapes of the Second Seminole War

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003464/00001

Material Information

Title: Recovering the Landscapes of the Second Seminole War A Historical Archaeological Approach to Gulf Coast Florida
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Werner, William
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Seminole Wars
Historical Archaeology
Nineteenth-Century Forts
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This historical archaeological study employs the notion of a cultural landscape as the scale of analysis in examining the military transformation of the greater Tampa Bay region during the years preceding and immediately following the Second Seminole War (1835-1842). Fort Brooke (1824-1887), located on Tampa Bay, Fort Armistead (1840-184 1), located on Sarasota Bay, and Fort Hamer (1849-1850), located on the Manatee River, each played a distinct role in the subjugation, containment, and removal of the Seminole peoples of Florida under Andrew Jackson's Indian removal program. However, it is argued that prior to the systematic removal of the Seminoles from areas of U.S. settlement, Seminole and European-American social relations were more frequently characterized by trade and economic interaction than by violence or warfare. The U.S. occupation of Florida saw new conceptualizations of the land and new attitudes towards its occupants. Thus, Seminole War-period military fortifications should not be interpreted solely as isolated military sites, but as nodes on the shifting boundaries of multiple cultural landscapes in the shaping of the modem American landscape.
Statement of Responsibility: by William Werner
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Baram, Uzi

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 W4
System ID: NCFE003464:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003464/00001

Material Information

Title: Recovering the Landscapes of the Second Seminole War A Historical Archaeological Approach to Gulf Coast Florida
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Werner, William
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Seminole Wars
Historical Archaeology
Nineteenth-Century Forts
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This historical archaeological study employs the notion of a cultural landscape as the scale of analysis in examining the military transformation of the greater Tampa Bay region during the years preceding and immediately following the Second Seminole War (1835-1842). Fort Brooke (1824-1887), located on Tampa Bay, Fort Armistead (1840-184 1), located on Sarasota Bay, and Fort Hamer (1849-1850), located on the Manatee River, each played a distinct role in the subjugation, containment, and removal of the Seminole peoples of Florida under Andrew Jackson's Indian removal program. However, it is argued that prior to the systematic removal of the Seminoles from areas of U.S. settlement, Seminole and European-American social relations were more frequently characterized by trade and economic interaction than by violence or warfare. The U.S. occupation of Florida saw new conceptualizations of the land and new attitudes towards its occupants. Thus, Seminole War-period military fortifications should not be interpreted solely as isolated military sites, but as nodes on the shifting boundaries of multiple cultural landscapes in the shaping of the modem American landscape.
Statement of Responsibility: by William Werner
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Baram, Uzi

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 W4
System ID: NCFE003464:00001

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