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What Must Remain Public? Essays on Privitization, the Consitution, and Public Administration

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003463/00001

Material Information

Title: What Must Remain Public? Essays on Privitization, the Consitution, and Public Administration
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Warner, Dancan
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Privitization
Private Prisons
Administrative State
Non-Delegation Doctrine
Government
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Questions regarding the proper role of the state and the activities that it should perform are central to American political debate. The privatization of governmental functions is often conceived of as a part of this debate, although it does not necessarily represent a reduction in the scope of governmental activity. Rather, privatization raises questions as to the governmental nature of certain activities; can private actors legitimately perform state functions, or are there some powers that are so central to the identity of the state as such that they must remain within direct governmental control? Are there functions that the state must perform because only it has the authority to do so? The items in this portfolio span three years of my education and are tied together by the central theme of state power and authority. The first part of the project is a research paper on prison privatization, which discusses the development of prison privatization and explores the relationship between corrections corporations and the policy process. The second essay discusses the non-delegation doctrine, a principle of constitutional law that is intended to ensure that legislative power is retained by popularly elected officials in Congress. In the third paper, I again deal with the separation of powers in discussing the constitutional issues associated with the exercise of discretion by bureaucrats. The final essay discusses Woodrow Wilson's idea of a politics-administration dichotomy and its inapplicability to modern public administration. Overall, these papers come together to formulate an argument that there are core state functions, such as incarceration, that are inherently governmental and therefore should not be privatized.
Statement of Responsibility: by Dancan Warner
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Lewis, Eugene

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 W13
System ID: NCFE003463:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003463/00001

Material Information

Title: What Must Remain Public? Essays on Privitization, the Consitution, and Public Administration
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Warner, Dancan
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Privitization
Private Prisons
Administrative State
Non-Delegation Doctrine
Government
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Questions regarding the proper role of the state and the activities that it should perform are central to American political debate. The privatization of governmental functions is often conceived of as a part of this debate, although it does not necessarily represent a reduction in the scope of governmental activity. Rather, privatization raises questions as to the governmental nature of certain activities; can private actors legitimately perform state functions, or are there some powers that are so central to the identity of the state as such that they must remain within direct governmental control? Are there functions that the state must perform because only it has the authority to do so? The items in this portfolio span three years of my education and are tied together by the central theme of state power and authority. The first part of the project is a research paper on prison privatization, which discusses the development of prison privatization and explores the relationship between corrections corporations and the policy process. The second essay discusses the non-delegation doctrine, a principle of constitutional law that is intended to ensure that legislative power is retained by popularly elected officials in Congress. In the third paper, I again deal with the separation of powers in discussing the constitutional issues associated with the exercise of discretion by bureaucrats. The final essay discusses Woodrow Wilson's idea of a politics-administration dichotomy and its inapplicability to modern public administration. Overall, these papers come together to formulate an argument that there are core state functions, such as incarceration, that are inherently governmental and therefore should not be privatized.
Statement of Responsibility: by Dancan Warner
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Lewis, Eugene

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 W13
System ID: NCFE003463:00001

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