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Manatee Psychophysical Testing

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003441/00001

Material Information

Title: Manatee Psychophysical Testing Are Results Biased by Sequence Learning?
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Rycyk, Athena
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Manatee
Sequence Learning
Gellermann
Fellows
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Researchers investigating sensory abilities of animals employ counterbalanced schedules in detection and discrimination tasks. These schedules determine the order for stimulus presentation, for example, signal present vs. signal absent in a detection task, or left vs. right orientation for the correct choice in a discrimination task. If property applied, such schedules can prevent subjects from using sequential cues to influence performance. Two of the most commonly used schedules, Gellermann Schedules and Fellows Schedules, are constrained by short sequences with no more than three of the same trial in a row. Unfortunately, evidence indicates that some species, including harbor seals, are sensitive to constrained sequences, introducing a bias to the results of psychophysical testing, potentially causing overestimates of sensory abilities. One way to test for sensitivity to the schedules is to compare the percentage of correct trials after short and long sequences. The probability of a change in schedule sequence increases with the number of same trials. For example, the probability of a change of the correct trial from the left to the right side is greater after three left-correct trials in a row, when there will always be a change, than after only one left trial, when both change and no-change are possible. Recent experiments with two manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) indicated that they were not sensitive to trial sequences in two-choice discrimination tests of visual acuity using Gellermann and Fellows Schedules. After more than 5,000 trials for one manatee and over 2,000 trials for the other manatee, the subjects' performances did not differ after long trial runs compared to short trial runs. The absence of sequence bias was found even on those trials where discriminations were difficult and alternative strategies would be more likely to influence results.
Statement of Responsibility: by Athena Rycyk
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Bauer, Gordon

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 R99
System ID: NCFE003441:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003441/00001

Material Information

Title: Manatee Psychophysical Testing Are Results Biased by Sequence Learning?
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Rycyk, Athena
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Manatee
Sequence Learning
Gellermann
Fellows
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Researchers investigating sensory abilities of animals employ counterbalanced schedules in detection and discrimination tasks. These schedules determine the order for stimulus presentation, for example, signal present vs. signal absent in a detection task, or left vs. right orientation for the correct choice in a discrimination task. If property applied, such schedules can prevent subjects from using sequential cues to influence performance. Two of the most commonly used schedules, Gellermann Schedules and Fellows Schedules, are constrained by short sequences with no more than three of the same trial in a row. Unfortunately, evidence indicates that some species, including harbor seals, are sensitive to constrained sequences, introducing a bias to the results of psychophysical testing, potentially causing overestimates of sensory abilities. One way to test for sensitivity to the schedules is to compare the percentage of correct trials after short and long sequences. The probability of a change in schedule sequence increases with the number of same trials. For example, the probability of a change of the correct trial from the left to the right side is greater after three left-correct trials in a row, when there will always be a change, than after only one left trial, when both change and no-change are possible. Recent experiments with two manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) indicated that they were not sensitive to trial sequences in two-choice discrimination tests of visual acuity using Gellermann and Fellows Schedules. After more than 5,000 trials for one manatee and over 2,000 trials for the other manatee, the subjects' performances did not differ after long trial runs compared to short trial runs. The absence of sequence bias was found even on those trials where discriminations were difficult and alternative strategies would be more likely to influence results.
Statement of Responsibility: by Athena Rycyk
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Bauer, Gordon

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 R99
System ID: NCFE003441:00001

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