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Dermatography and the Chemical Composition of Tattoo Pigments

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003433/00001

Material Information

Title: Dermatography and the Chemical Composition of Tattoo Pigments
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Ramsey, Matthew
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Tattoo
Pigment/Chemistry
Art History
Spectroscopy
Health
FDA
Analysis
Japan
Dermatography
Irezumi
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Because the Food and Drug Administration does not actively regulate tattoo pigments, laboratory and literature investigations were completed in order to elucidate the chemical compositions and health implications of tattoo pigments. Various spectroscopic techniques (X-ray, UV-visible, NMR, IR) were used to characterize a set of commercial pigments, but the insoluble nature of these pigments somewhat limited the results of this study. While no pigments were definitively identified, the data does suggest that most of these pigments are mixtures of organic and inorganic materials. Furthermore, it is interesting to note that nearly all the pigments described can be found in painting materials reference literature, which strongly suggests that artists simply reapplied their talents from the canvas to the skin. This study has been supplemented with an overview of the history and aesthetics of dermatography, and an emphasis is placed on irezumi, the Japanese style of tattooing. This particular dermatographic art is rare because it portrays an unparalleled combination of anthropological tradition and aesthetic function.
Statement of Responsibility: by Matthew Ramsey
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Scudder, Paul

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 R18
System ID: NCFE003433:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003433/00001

Material Information

Title: Dermatography and the Chemical Composition of Tattoo Pigments
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Ramsey, Matthew
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Tattoo
Pigment/Chemistry
Art History
Spectroscopy
Health
FDA
Analysis
Japan
Dermatography
Irezumi
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Because the Food and Drug Administration does not actively regulate tattoo pigments, laboratory and literature investigations were completed in order to elucidate the chemical compositions and health implications of tattoo pigments. Various spectroscopic techniques (X-ray, UV-visible, NMR, IR) were used to characterize a set of commercial pigments, but the insoluble nature of these pigments somewhat limited the results of this study. While no pigments were definitively identified, the data does suggest that most of these pigments are mixtures of organic and inorganic materials. Furthermore, it is interesting to note that nearly all the pigments described can be found in painting materials reference literature, which strongly suggests that artists simply reapplied their talents from the canvas to the skin. This study has been supplemented with an overview of the history and aesthetics of dermatography, and an emphasis is placed on irezumi, the Japanese style of tattooing. This particular dermatographic art is rare because it portrays an unparalleled combination of anthropological tradition and aesthetic function.
Statement of Responsibility: by Matthew Ramsey
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Scudder, Paul

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 R18
System ID: NCFE003433:00001

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