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The Democratic Potential of Information and Communication Technologies

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003420/00001

Material Information

Title: The Democratic Potential of Information and Communication Technologies An Alternative to the 'Clash of Civilizations'?
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Myerscough, Rhea Stacy
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Islam
Democracy
Technology
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have often been hailed as the harbingers of a new global democratic age, but how much democratizing capacity can be attributed to these developments? This thesis approaches this puzzle with a comparative study of countries with a Muslim majority. This research is particularly interesting as my results help undermine culturally fundamentalist arguments that characterize Islamic culture and democracy as mutually exclusive. I addressed the puzzle from three different angles: statistical analysis, political theory, and case studies. The results show that, first, GDP is a stronger correlate to democracy than ICT diffusion, except at high income levels where certain technologies become more significant than GDP. These results hint at a potential relationship worthy of further investigation, even if not statistically definitive. Applying public sphere theory to the United Arab Emirates, Turkey, Nigeria, and Indonesia, I found that ICTs are being used by both citizens and regimes to alter the public sphere in order to control or promote civic pluralist discourse. Promotion of civic pluralist discourse can spark the beginnings of civil society organization, considered a prerequisite for democracy, and the use of ICTs towards such ends merits further research.
Statement of Responsibility: by Rhea Stacy Myerscough
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Hicks, Barbara

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 M99
System ID: NCFE003420:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003420/00001

Material Information

Title: The Democratic Potential of Information and Communication Technologies An Alternative to the 'Clash of Civilizations'?
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Myerscough, Rhea Stacy
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Islam
Democracy
Technology
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have often been hailed as the harbingers of a new global democratic age, but how much democratizing capacity can be attributed to these developments? This thesis approaches this puzzle with a comparative study of countries with a Muslim majority. This research is particularly interesting as my results help undermine culturally fundamentalist arguments that characterize Islamic culture and democracy as mutually exclusive. I addressed the puzzle from three different angles: statistical analysis, political theory, and case studies. The results show that, first, GDP is a stronger correlate to democracy than ICT diffusion, except at high income levels where certain technologies become more significant than GDP. These results hint at a potential relationship worthy of further investigation, even if not statistically definitive. Applying public sphere theory to the United Arab Emirates, Turkey, Nigeria, and Indonesia, I found that ICTs are being used by both citizens and regimes to alter the public sphere in order to control or promote civic pluralist discourse. Promotion of civic pluralist discourse can spark the beginnings of civil society organization, considered a prerequisite for democracy, and the use of ICTs towards such ends merits further research.
Statement of Responsibility: by Rhea Stacy Myerscough
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Hicks, Barbara

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 M99
System ID: NCFE003420:00001

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