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An Analysis of the Physical Development of a Community

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003414/00001

Material Information

Title: An Analysis of the Physical Development of a Community
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Meneely, James
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Suburban Sprawl
Community Development
Port Charlotte
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The ways in which our communities are physically arranged directly affects many aspects of life within our society. The economy, the natural environment, crime and safety, even the manner in which we socialize, are all influenced to varying degrees by the built landscape: the placement of buildings and roads, and the relationships that are formed between public and private spaces. Suburban sprawl is a term familiar to many but, as I discovered during the course of this project, well understood by few. And the group that appears to understand sprawl the least is the general public. Therefore, one of the main goals of this thesis is to understand the subject of sprawl, not only what exactly it entails but the problems this system of land development creates and its impact on the health of our communities and our quality of life. But are there rational alternatives to sprawl: ones that can be integrated into today's high-tech society without destroying existing communities? This question is explored in this thesis, and the general conclusion is that yes, there are alternatives to sprawl. And the most promising approach appears to one in which current-minded thinking about traditional neighborhood development will offer new hope for better, healthier communities of place. I use Port Charlotte, Florida as a case study of the challenges of sprawl. In addition, I comment on the field of architecture and its possible role in building healthy communities.
Statement of Responsibility: by James Meneely
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Brain, David

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 M5
System ID: NCFE003414:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003414/00001

Material Information

Title: An Analysis of the Physical Development of a Community
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Meneely, James
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Suburban Sprawl
Community Development
Port Charlotte
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The ways in which our communities are physically arranged directly affects many aspects of life within our society. The economy, the natural environment, crime and safety, even the manner in which we socialize, are all influenced to varying degrees by the built landscape: the placement of buildings and roads, and the relationships that are formed between public and private spaces. Suburban sprawl is a term familiar to many but, as I discovered during the course of this project, well understood by few. And the group that appears to understand sprawl the least is the general public. Therefore, one of the main goals of this thesis is to understand the subject of sprawl, not only what exactly it entails but the problems this system of land development creates and its impact on the health of our communities and our quality of life. But are there rational alternatives to sprawl: ones that can be integrated into today's high-tech society without destroying existing communities? This question is explored in this thesis, and the general conclusion is that yes, there are alternatives to sprawl. And the most promising approach appears to one in which current-minded thinking about traditional neighborhood development will offer new hope for better, healthier communities of place. I use Port Charlotte, Florida as a case study of the challenges of sprawl. In addition, I comment on the field of architecture and its possible role in building healthy communities.
Statement of Responsibility: by James Meneely
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Brain, David

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 M5
System ID: NCFE003414:00001

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