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Asperger Syndrome

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003411/00001

Material Information

Title: Asperger Syndrome Using 'Obsessions' to Increase Mathematical Achievement
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Mazza, Jessica
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Asperger Syndrome
Mathematical Achievement
Treatment Programs
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: A major characteristic of individuals with Asperger syndrome is a preoccupying interest, or 'obsession', with a specific subject. The present study was designed to test whether mathematical achievement in a child with Asperger syndrome who has a specific obsession can be increased by incorporating this obsession into a mathematical intervention. The intervention included two interactive treatment periods. The targeted math skills included both numeric and word problems. During the first period of treatment sessions, the child worked out double-digit addition and subtraction problems with concrete manipulatives (animals). After a reversal period where the treatment sessions were removed, a second treatment period was administered. During this time, the object of obsession (dinosaurs) replaced the concrete manipulatives. It was hypothesized that the number of correct math problems would increase when the object of obsession was introduced into the interactive sessions and math problems, Results indicated a small increase in math skills during the concrete manipulation phase, but a marked improvement in the number of math problems done correctly during the obsession treatment period, with a dramatic increase in word problem performance. The gains in math improvement did not fade during the 2 week period of reversal, when the object of obsession was removed. It is suggested that obsessions are effective in intervention because they motivate and capture the attention of the child. It is also suggested that due to these findings, future research could consider using obsessions in interventions to improve performance in other domains, such as reading.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jessica Mazza
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Barton, Michelle

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 M4
System ID: NCFE003411:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003411/00001

Material Information

Title: Asperger Syndrome Using 'Obsessions' to Increase Mathematical Achievement
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Mazza, Jessica
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Asperger Syndrome
Mathematical Achievement
Treatment Programs
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: A major characteristic of individuals with Asperger syndrome is a preoccupying interest, or 'obsession', with a specific subject. The present study was designed to test whether mathematical achievement in a child with Asperger syndrome who has a specific obsession can be increased by incorporating this obsession into a mathematical intervention. The intervention included two interactive treatment periods. The targeted math skills included both numeric and word problems. During the first period of treatment sessions, the child worked out double-digit addition and subtraction problems with concrete manipulatives (animals). After a reversal period where the treatment sessions were removed, a second treatment period was administered. During this time, the object of obsession (dinosaurs) replaced the concrete manipulatives. It was hypothesized that the number of correct math problems would increase when the object of obsession was introduced into the interactive sessions and math problems, Results indicated a small increase in math skills during the concrete manipulation phase, but a marked improvement in the number of math problems done correctly during the obsession treatment period, with a dramatic increase in word problem performance. The gains in math improvement did not fade during the 2 week period of reversal, when the object of obsession was removed. It is suggested that obsessions are effective in intervention because they motivate and capture the attention of the child. It is also suggested that due to these findings, future research could consider using obsessions in interventions to improve performance in other domains, such as reading.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jessica Mazza
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Barton, Michelle

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 M4
System ID: NCFE003411:00001

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