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Early Experience and Basal Ganglia Function in Deer Mice (Peromyscus Maniculatus)

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003401/00001

Material Information

Title: Early Experience and Basal Ganglia Function in Deer Mice (Peromyscus Maniculatus)
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Lewis, John Benjamin
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Basal Ganglia
Learning
Memory
Addiction
Drugs
Drug Abuse
Stereotypy
Stress
Hippocumpus
Spatial Learning
Motor Learning
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Early experience affects basal ganglia-mediated behavior in many species. In this study two early-life manipulations were used to evaluate the effects that early experiences can have on basal ganglia-mediated behaviors in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). One pre-weaning manipulation involved brief separation of neonatal pups from their mother for 15 minutes a day, thereby positively altering pup-dam interactions. The second, postweaning manipulation involved environmental enrichment, a method of increasing spatial density, social density, novelty, and opportunity for species-typical behaviors. The presence and absence of these manipulations led to the creation of four experimental groups. There were three behavioral outcome measures: stereotypy, navigational maze learning, and amphetamine self-administration. No differences were found among groups for either stereotypy or amphetamine self-administration. However, enriched mice exhibited more correct initial turns, a faster latency to reach a reward in the maze, and an increased preference for procedural learning, compared to standard caged mice. In addition, standard cage mice that displayed higher stereotypy performed worse in maze training, and poor maze performers consumed more amphetamine. Standard laboratory caging, a deprived environment, may generate more mice with basal ganglia-related behavioral dysfunctions.
Statement of Responsibility: by John Benjamin Lewis
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Harley, Heidi

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 L6
System ID: NCFE003401:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003401/00001

Material Information

Title: Early Experience and Basal Ganglia Function in Deer Mice (Peromyscus Maniculatus)
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Lewis, John Benjamin
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Basal Ganglia
Learning
Memory
Addiction
Drugs
Drug Abuse
Stereotypy
Stress
Hippocumpus
Spatial Learning
Motor Learning
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Early experience affects basal ganglia-mediated behavior in many species. In this study two early-life manipulations were used to evaluate the effects that early experiences can have on basal ganglia-mediated behaviors in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). One pre-weaning manipulation involved brief separation of neonatal pups from their mother for 15 minutes a day, thereby positively altering pup-dam interactions. The second, postweaning manipulation involved environmental enrichment, a method of increasing spatial density, social density, novelty, and opportunity for species-typical behaviors. The presence and absence of these manipulations led to the creation of four experimental groups. There were three behavioral outcome measures: stereotypy, navigational maze learning, and amphetamine self-administration. No differences were found among groups for either stereotypy or amphetamine self-administration. However, enriched mice exhibited more correct initial turns, a faster latency to reach a reward in the maze, and an increased preference for procedural learning, compared to standard caged mice. In addition, standard cage mice that displayed higher stereotypy performed worse in maze training, and poor maze performers consumed more amphetamine. Standard laboratory caging, a deprived environment, may generate more mice with basal ganglia-related behavioral dysfunctions.
Statement of Responsibility: by John Benjamin Lewis
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Harley, Heidi

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 L6
System ID: NCFE003401:00001

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