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Satanism

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003395/00001

Material Information

Title: Satanism Yesterday and Today
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Judd, Franchescha
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Satanism
The Devil
West-Memphis Three-Case
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The term 'cult' is virtually meaningless. It tells us far more about those who use it than about those to whom it is applied. It has become little more than a label slapped on religious groups regarded as too exotic, marginal or dangerous.' -- Michael Barkun The purpose of this thesis is to demonstrate that Satan and the concepts that he embodies have changed from antiquity to the present. By looking at the formation of the early Christian Church, the centralization of the medieval Church, and the modem movements of Satanism, one can observe how the figure of Satan has been molded over time. The degree to which ancient, medieval and modem societies have relied on satanic symbols depends on the amount of anxiety and tension that each society has had to face. The figure of the devil evolved in order to resolve certain aspects of the early Christian faith, and explain the difficulty in establishing itself as a religion. During the Middle Ages, the Church enhanced this personified devil to justify the suppression of any Christian opposition during this time. The European witch-craze associated the devil with witchcraft, and, consequently, the occult was forever linked to the satanic. Based on the historical model established by the medieval church, which linked occultism to diabolism, many of the allegations made against modern Satanists are refashioned accusations of those once made against witches. The devil, however, has less power in modem society and has reverted to being a concept rather than a person. By examining these factors, this thesis will show how the image of Satan has been used throughout history to deal with social and political issues.
Statement of Responsibility: by Franchescha Judd
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Langston, Douglas

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 J9
System ID: NCFE003395:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003395/00001

Material Information

Title: Satanism Yesterday and Today
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Judd, Franchescha
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Satanism
The Devil
West-Memphis Three-Case
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The term 'cult' is virtually meaningless. It tells us far more about those who use it than about those to whom it is applied. It has become little more than a label slapped on religious groups regarded as too exotic, marginal or dangerous.' -- Michael Barkun The purpose of this thesis is to demonstrate that Satan and the concepts that he embodies have changed from antiquity to the present. By looking at the formation of the early Christian Church, the centralization of the medieval Church, and the modem movements of Satanism, one can observe how the figure of Satan has been molded over time. The degree to which ancient, medieval and modem societies have relied on satanic symbols depends on the amount of anxiety and tension that each society has had to face. The figure of the devil evolved in order to resolve certain aspects of the early Christian faith, and explain the difficulty in establishing itself as a religion. During the Middle Ages, the Church enhanced this personified devil to justify the suppression of any Christian opposition during this time. The European witch-craze associated the devil with witchcraft, and, consequently, the occult was forever linked to the satanic. Based on the historical model established by the medieval church, which linked occultism to diabolism, many of the allegations made against modern Satanists are refashioned accusations of those once made against witches. The devil, however, has less power in modem society and has reverted to being a concept rather than a person. By examining these factors, this thesis will show how the image of Satan has been used throughout history to deal with social and political issues.
Statement of Responsibility: by Franchescha Judd
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Langston, Douglas

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 J9
System ID: NCFE003395:00001

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