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Strategic Applications

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003394/00001

Material Information

Title: Strategic Applications The History and Utility of Game Theory in the Social sciences
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Jones, Michael A.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Rational Choice Theory
Game Theory
Heuristic(s)
Decision Making
Political Psychology
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Beginning with The Theory of Economic Games and Behavior by John Von Neumann and Oscar Morgenstern (1944), a theory based on the maximization of payoffs was applied to models of rational choice and used to explain how people make their daily decisions. Many political scientists were eager to include empiricism in political science and applied rational choice theory to voting, revolutionary activity, the coercive power of leaders, trade, and nearly every other aspect of political science. This ultimately unsuccessful revolution met with scrutinous debunkers (e.g., Green and Shapiro, 1994; March and Olsen, 1984). Meanwhile, cognitive psychologists (e.g., Kahneman & Tversky, 1972, 1974, 1982) were attempting to determine the cognitive processes that occur during decisionmaking. The notion of invariance, consistency of choices, was researched and ultimately contested by findings. In an original study presented here, 174 undergraduate students with varying types of tutelage in rational choice theory/game theory, framing, and/or heuristics decided among various alternatives originally presented to participants by Kahneman and Tversky in 1981 and 1988. Experience with rational choice theory and heuristics had no effect on consistency in decision-making. Neither did area of major nor year in college. All subjects were inconsistent. This inconsistency in decisions between choices with mathematically equivalent outcomes supports other findings that human decision-making is generally variant.
Statement of Responsibility: by Michael A. Jones
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Fitzgerald, Keith; Harley, Heidi

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 J7
System ID: NCFE003394:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003394/00001

Material Information

Title: Strategic Applications The History and Utility of Game Theory in the Social sciences
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Jones, Michael A.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Rational Choice Theory
Game Theory
Heuristic(s)
Decision Making
Political Psychology
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Beginning with The Theory of Economic Games and Behavior by John Von Neumann and Oscar Morgenstern (1944), a theory based on the maximization of payoffs was applied to models of rational choice and used to explain how people make their daily decisions. Many political scientists were eager to include empiricism in political science and applied rational choice theory to voting, revolutionary activity, the coercive power of leaders, trade, and nearly every other aspect of political science. This ultimately unsuccessful revolution met with scrutinous debunkers (e.g., Green and Shapiro, 1994; March and Olsen, 1984). Meanwhile, cognitive psychologists (e.g., Kahneman & Tversky, 1972, 1974, 1982) were attempting to determine the cognitive processes that occur during decisionmaking. The notion of invariance, consistency of choices, was researched and ultimately contested by findings. In an original study presented here, 174 undergraduate students with varying types of tutelage in rational choice theory/game theory, framing, and/or heuristics decided among various alternatives originally presented to participants by Kahneman and Tversky in 1981 and 1988. Experience with rational choice theory and heuristics had no effect on consistency in decision-making. Neither did area of major nor year in college. All subjects were inconsistent. This inconsistency in decisions between choices with mathematically equivalent outcomes supports other findings that human decision-making is generally variant.
Statement of Responsibility: by Michael A. Jones
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Fitzgerald, Keith; Harley, Heidi

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 J7
System ID: NCFE003394:00001

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