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A Survey of Indigenous Rights in Alaska, Australia, and Canada

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003388/00001

Material Information

Title: A Survey of Indigenous Rights in Alaska, Australia, and Canada
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Iverson, Melanie
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Indigenous Rights
Citizenship
Colonization
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The overarching topic of this project is indigenous rights; that is, the rights of peoples whose ancestors were dispossessed of their land by the colonizing activities of European countries, and who today often suffer from political, economic, and social inequality as a result of this past marginalization. Indigenous groups today argue that they have a historical right to receive land, monetary compensation, and protection of their cultural heritage from the countries they live in as reparations for the mistreatment they encountered during colonization. The body of this portfolio opens with a discussion about whether the views on wealth expressed in Hobbes' Leviathan and More's Utopia could be reconciled. This essay has particular relevance to the topic of indigenous rights because Hobbes and More were writing at the time that Europeans began establishing colonies, and their ideas heavily influenced the colonizing activities of the British. The second paper discusses how the Alaska Native Claims Settlement affected the status of citizenship for Alaska Natives, determining that it did not achieve its overall goal of incorporating Native society into mainstream U.S. society. The third paper discusses the differences between the rights Australia and Canada have granted to their respective indigenous populations from the 1970s to the present, and proposes a few explanations for the variation that exists. The conclusion explains that Canada has found the most advantageous method for granting indigenous groups some measure of autonomy while still giving them equal rights of citizenship within the dominant society.
Statement of Responsibility: by Melanie Iverson
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Fitzgerald, Keith

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 I9
System ID: NCFE003388:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003388/00001

Material Information

Title: A Survey of Indigenous Rights in Alaska, Australia, and Canada
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Iverson, Melanie
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Indigenous Rights
Citizenship
Colonization
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The overarching topic of this project is indigenous rights; that is, the rights of peoples whose ancestors were dispossessed of their land by the colonizing activities of European countries, and who today often suffer from political, economic, and social inequality as a result of this past marginalization. Indigenous groups today argue that they have a historical right to receive land, monetary compensation, and protection of their cultural heritage from the countries they live in as reparations for the mistreatment they encountered during colonization. The body of this portfolio opens with a discussion about whether the views on wealth expressed in Hobbes' Leviathan and More's Utopia could be reconciled. This essay has particular relevance to the topic of indigenous rights because Hobbes and More were writing at the time that Europeans began establishing colonies, and their ideas heavily influenced the colonizing activities of the British. The second paper discusses how the Alaska Native Claims Settlement affected the status of citizenship for Alaska Natives, determining that it did not achieve its overall goal of incorporating Native society into mainstream U.S. society. The third paper discusses the differences between the rights Australia and Canada have granted to their respective indigenous populations from the 1970s to the present, and proposes a few explanations for the variation that exists. The conclusion explains that Canada has found the most advantageous method for granting indigenous groups some measure of autonomy while still giving them equal rights of citizenship within the dominant society.
Statement of Responsibility: by Melanie Iverson
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Fitzgerald, Keith

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 I9
System ID: NCFE003388:00001

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