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Early Motherhood Experiences in a Nicaraguan Society

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003381/00001

Material Information

Title: Early Motherhood Experiences in a Nicaraguan Society An Analysis of Stress and Support
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Halsall, Viannella R.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Nicaragua
Postpartum
Stress
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Motherhood is a critical transition for women in terms of work and the constant presence of novel situations. Various researchers have found that mothers consistently report feelings of stress and anxiety during this time period, but that social support helps to alleviate increased stress levels of mothers within this time. The aims of this study were to explore the relationships between perceptions of pregnancy and maternity, emotions, and support networks of first-year postpartum women from a Nicaraguan society. Data were collected by means of written surveys and interviews incorporating the Perceived Stress Scale (Cohen, Marmack, & Mermelstein, 1983). Results show that, on average, pregnancy yielded more negative-type responses while maternity more positive-type. Overall, participants' stress levels fell within mid-range; and demographic variables did not significantly correlate with perceived stress levels. However, there was a ceiling effect of participants reporting daily help and support. Sources of stress and social support networks of participants are discussed. Since there is no known published research that has investigated these patterns among Nicaraguan women, future research extended to Latin America can benefit from the observations of this study.
Statement of Responsibility: by Viannella R. Halsall
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Barton, Michelle

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 H19
System ID: NCFE003381:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003381/00001

Material Information

Title: Early Motherhood Experiences in a Nicaraguan Society An Analysis of Stress and Support
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Halsall, Viannella R.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Nicaragua
Postpartum
Stress
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Motherhood is a critical transition for women in terms of work and the constant presence of novel situations. Various researchers have found that mothers consistently report feelings of stress and anxiety during this time period, but that social support helps to alleviate increased stress levels of mothers within this time. The aims of this study were to explore the relationships between perceptions of pregnancy and maternity, emotions, and support networks of first-year postpartum women from a Nicaraguan society. Data were collected by means of written surveys and interviews incorporating the Perceived Stress Scale (Cohen, Marmack, & Mermelstein, 1983). Results show that, on average, pregnancy yielded more negative-type responses while maternity more positive-type. Overall, participants' stress levels fell within mid-range; and demographic variables did not significantly correlate with perceived stress levels. However, there was a ceiling effect of participants reporting daily help and support. Sources of stress and social support networks of participants are discussed. Since there is no known published research that has investigated these patterns among Nicaraguan women, future research extended to Latin America can benefit from the observations of this study.
Statement of Responsibility: by Viannella R. Halsall
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Barton, Michelle

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 H19
System ID: NCFE003381:00001

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