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Falling Back on Our Gods

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003377/00001

Material Information

Title: Falling Back on Our Gods A Study of Supersition and Anxiety
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Gromer, Jill
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Superstition
Anxiety
Religion
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Research indicates increases in both superstitious behavior and religiosity during situations that are characterized by unpredictability or stress. Additionally, it has been shown that unpredictability can precede anxiety. These findings suggest that religiosity and superstitiousness may have a relationship with anxiety. Indeed, some research finds that religiosity is negatively correlated with anxiety. However, research on superstition and anxiety is scant. The goal of the present study was to investigate the relation between superstitious behavior and anxiety. Superstitious behavior was expected to relate negatively to anxiousness. Survey packets containing the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and a newly developed scale of superstitious behavior were administered to 118 undergraduates. Socially accepted and widely practiced superstitious behaviors were found to correlate negatively with anxiety. However, individualized superstitious behaviors that involve the assignment of luck to objects and symbols were found to correlate positively with anxiety. The results of this study suggest that the relations between anxiety and superstitiousness are complex and dependent on the type of superstition being measured.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jill Gromer
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Ryan, Kimberly

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 G87
System ID: NCFE003377:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003377/00001

Material Information

Title: Falling Back on Our Gods A Study of Supersition and Anxiety
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Gromer, Jill
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Superstition
Anxiety
Religion
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Research indicates increases in both superstitious behavior and religiosity during situations that are characterized by unpredictability or stress. Additionally, it has been shown that unpredictability can precede anxiety. These findings suggest that religiosity and superstitiousness may have a relationship with anxiety. Indeed, some research finds that religiosity is negatively correlated with anxiety. However, research on superstition and anxiety is scant. The goal of the present study was to investigate the relation between superstitious behavior and anxiety. Superstitious behavior was expected to relate negatively to anxiousness. Survey packets containing the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and a newly developed scale of superstitious behavior were administered to 118 undergraduates. Socially accepted and widely practiced superstitious behaviors were found to correlate negatively with anxiety. However, individualized superstitious behaviors that involve the assignment of luck to objects and symbols were found to correlate positively with anxiety. The results of this study suggest that the relations between anxiety and superstitiousness are complex and dependent on the type of superstition being measured.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jill Gromer
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Ryan, Kimberly

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 G87
System ID: NCFE003377:00001

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