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Damned Enlightenment

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003341/00001

Material Information

Title: Damned Enlightenment A Closer Look at Hart Crane's 'Cape Hatteras' section of The Bridge, with Original Poems
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Bonfonti, Brian Lee
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Crane, Hart
Poetry
Whitman, Walt
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: By 'damned enlightenment' I mean excessively acute perception of reality obtained through intentionally pursuing intensity in experience, a process both efficacious and costly. First I discuss the American poet Hart Crane and his efforts to contain and express his version of vision. Secondly, I have included pieces of my own writing that deal with the quest for vision as well, to exemplify the notion of 'damned enlightenment.' In Section One, I give a brief introduction to the life and works of Hart Crane. Section Two moves to a close reading of Crane's 'Cape Hatteras' section of his long poem The Bridge, to explore his interweaving with other poets, Wait Whitman, Edgar Allen Poe, and T.S. Eliot. This portion of the project functions less as an argument than as a collection of perspectives on Crane's works, particularly 'Cape Hatteras.' Appendix A discusses those poems of Walt Whitman specifically referenced in 'Cape Hatteras.' I have compiled information on Crane and Whitman to explain their interrelation. Appendix B then discusses how Whitman and Crane's use technology in poetry. I have included copies of poems referenced and my close readings of several of these poems. Due to the often obscure, or time-specific nature of the poem, Appendix C offers a glossary of terms used in 'Cape Hatteras.' Section Three contains original poems.
Statement of Responsibility: by Brian Lee Bonfonti
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Miller, Arthur

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 B7
System ID: NCFE003341:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003341/00001

Material Information

Title: Damned Enlightenment A Closer Look at Hart Crane's 'Cape Hatteras' section of The Bridge, with Original Poems
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Bonfonti, Brian Lee
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Crane, Hart
Poetry
Whitman, Walt
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: By 'damned enlightenment' I mean excessively acute perception of reality obtained through intentionally pursuing intensity in experience, a process both efficacious and costly. First I discuss the American poet Hart Crane and his efforts to contain and express his version of vision. Secondly, I have included pieces of my own writing that deal with the quest for vision as well, to exemplify the notion of 'damned enlightenment.' In Section One, I give a brief introduction to the life and works of Hart Crane. Section Two moves to a close reading of Crane's 'Cape Hatteras' section of his long poem The Bridge, to explore his interweaving with other poets, Wait Whitman, Edgar Allen Poe, and T.S. Eliot. This portion of the project functions less as an argument than as a collection of perspectives on Crane's works, particularly 'Cape Hatteras.' Appendix A discusses those poems of Walt Whitman specifically referenced in 'Cape Hatteras.' I have compiled information on Crane and Whitman to explain their interrelation. Appendix B then discusses how Whitman and Crane's use technology in poetry. I have included copies of poems referenced and my close readings of several of these poems. Due to the often obscure, or time-specific nature of the poem, Appendix C offers a glossary of terms used in 'Cape Hatteras.' Section Three contains original poems.
Statement of Responsibility: by Brian Lee Bonfonti
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Miller, Arthur

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 B7
System ID: NCFE003341:00001

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