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Bioremediation of the Petroleum Hydrocarbons, BTEX, and the Gasoline Additive, MTBE

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003331/00001

Material Information

Title: Bioremediation of the Petroleum Hydrocarbons, BTEX, and the Gasoline Additive, MTBE
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Anderson, Vallerye
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Bioremediation
Petroleum
Contamination
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the xylene isomers (BTEX) are the most prevalent pollutants at petroleum-contaminated sites. The oxygenate, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), has recently become an additional widespread contaminant. BTEX and MTBE are compounds that can cause acute problems such as headaches and nausea and chronic illnesses such as central nervous system depression, mental confusion and even cancer. Exposure to oil spills can lead to reduced numbers of species and in aquatic communities, acute toxic effects on shellfish leads to the collapse of various food chains and eventually the death of higher carnivores. It is therefore necessary to detect, monitor and understand the movement of contaminant plumes. Plume concentration and migration is dependent upon not only biological and chemical factors but also physical parameters such as those governed by soil composition. The soil composition of the subsurface helps to determine the tendency of the plume to travel horizontally, longitudinally or transversely as well as the likelihood of contaminant sorption and hence reduced biological availability. Further plume analysis can reveal natural attenuation rates that will assist in treatment decisions. In severe cases, enhanced remediation method must be implemented. Enhanced remediation processes are often conducted ex-situ such as incineration, thermal desorption, stabilization, composting, bioreacting and landfarming. However, these methods can accrue high costs because the contaminants must be extracted and transported. Bioreactors are often suitable remediation solutions because of the significant control they offer over various physical and biological parameters. Also, augmentation with the bacteria, Pseudomonas putida, has been found to readily degrade BTEX but not yet MTBE. Nevertheless, recent research has indicated that there are microorganisms capable of significant MTBE mineralization.
Statement of Responsibility: by Vallerye Anderson
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: McCord, Elzie

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 A5
System ID: NCFE003331:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003331/00001

Material Information

Title: Bioremediation of the Petroleum Hydrocarbons, BTEX, and the Gasoline Additive, MTBE
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Anderson, Vallerye
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2004
Publication Date: 2004

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Bioremediation
Petroleum
Contamination
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the xylene isomers (BTEX) are the most prevalent pollutants at petroleum-contaminated sites. The oxygenate, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), has recently become an additional widespread contaminant. BTEX and MTBE are compounds that can cause acute problems such as headaches and nausea and chronic illnesses such as central nervous system depression, mental confusion and even cancer. Exposure to oil spills can lead to reduced numbers of species and in aquatic communities, acute toxic effects on shellfish leads to the collapse of various food chains and eventually the death of higher carnivores. It is therefore necessary to detect, monitor and understand the movement of contaminant plumes. Plume concentration and migration is dependent upon not only biological and chemical factors but also physical parameters such as those governed by soil composition. The soil composition of the subsurface helps to determine the tendency of the plume to travel horizontally, longitudinally or transversely as well as the likelihood of contaminant sorption and hence reduced biological availability. Further plume analysis can reveal natural attenuation rates that will assist in treatment decisions. In severe cases, enhanced remediation method must be implemented. Enhanced remediation processes are often conducted ex-situ such as incineration, thermal desorption, stabilization, composting, bioreacting and landfarming. However, these methods can accrue high costs because the contaminants must be extracted and transported. Bioreactors are often suitable remediation solutions because of the significant control they offer over various physical and biological parameters. Also, augmentation with the bacteria, Pseudomonas putida, has been found to readily degrade BTEX but not yet MTBE. Nevertheless, recent research has indicated that there are microorganisms capable of significant MTBE mineralization.
Statement of Responsibility: by Vallerye Anderson
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2004
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: McCord, Elzie

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2004 A5
System ID: NCFE003331:00001

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