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Meals and Melodrama

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003317/00001

Material Information

Title: Meals and Melodrama Commensality in Contemporary International Cinema
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Tolbert, Anneliese
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Meals
Cinema
Family
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Authors, filmmakers, psychologists and anthropologists agree: families who eat together, stay together. Contemporary world cinema embraces mealtime as a symbol of family togetherness. Melodrama provides the perfect generic venue for family mealtime, with its emphasis on relationships, domestic situations, and heightened emotion. In other films, foods can connote magical qualities, such as the ability to reconcile opposing cultural and religious values. This thesis project analyzes contemporary film dramas where rituals of cooking and eating are central framing devices. The idea behind such films is that mealtimes reveal character and conflict, while also providing a means of narrative resolution. Consequently, these 'food films' bring special focus to mealtime behaviors found across cultures and subcultures, employing the table as a universal gathering device and bonding mechanism for characters. Chapter One explores the historical underpinnings of melodrama and analyzes three films: Alfonso Arau's Como Agua Para Chocolate (Like Water for Chocolate) (1993), Ang Lee's Eat Drink Man Woman (1994), and Gurinder Chadha's What's Cooking (2000). Chapter Two briefly explains Scandinavian philosophy and literature (Kierkegaard, Andersen) as they inform Gabriel Axel's Babette's Feast (I 987) and Lasse Hallstr6m's Chocolat (2000). While the first part of this study explores the sharing of food at the family level, the second part explores how a community comes together around food as well.
Statement of Responsibility: by Anneliese Tolbert
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Cuomo, Glenn

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 T6
System ID: NCFE003317:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003317/00001

Material Information

Title: Meals and Melodrama Commensality in Contemporary International Cinema
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Tolbert, Anneliese
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Meals
Cinema
Family
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Authors, filmmakers, psychologists and anthropologists agree: families who eat together, stay together. Contemporary world cinema embraces mealtime as a symbol of family togetherness. Melodrama provides the perfect generic venue for family mealtime, with its emphasis on relationships, domestic situations, and heightened emotion. In other films, foods can connote magical qualities, such as the ability to reconcile opposing cultural and religious values. This thesis project analyzes contemporary film dramas where rituals of cooking and eating are central framing devices. The idea behind such films is that mealtimes reveal character and conflict, while also providing a means of narrative resolution. Consequently, these 'food films' bring special focus to mealtime behaviors found across cultures and subcultures, employing the table as a universal gathering device and bonding mechanism for characters. Chapter One explores the historical underpinnings of melodrama and analyzes three films: Alfonso Arau's Como Agua Para Chocolate (Like Water for Chocolate) (1993), Ang Lee's Eat Drink Man Woman (1994), and Gurinder Chadha's What's Cooking (2000). Chapter Two briefly explains Scandinavian philosophy and literature (Kierkegaard, Andersen) as they inform Gabriel Axel's Babette's Feast (I 987) and Lasse Hallstr6m's Chocolat (2000). While the first part of this study explores the sharing of food at the family level, the second part explores how a community comes together around food as well.
Statement of Responsibility: by Anneliese Tolbert
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Cuomo, Glenn

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 T6
System ID: NCFE003317:00001

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