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Chinese and Mexicans

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003307/00001

Material Information

Title: Chinese and Mexicans The Development of Policy Tools for US Entry Control Policy, 1850-1920
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Staebler, Amy
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Chinese
Mexican
Gold Rush
Historical Institutionalism
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The Chinese exclusion movement actually germinated from the pre-existing anti-Mexican movement in California, 1853 with the proposal of the Tingley Bill, suggesting that Chinese be forced to work like slaves in the mines. In 1853, this was an anti-Chinese movement, not a Chinese exclusion movement. The idea of exclusion as a policy option did not develop until 1855, when a special legislative committee considered exclusion and the American Party ran on the idea. After this split, the anti-Mexican movement never developed a conception of exclusion as a policy option: the anti-Mexican movements in California in the early 1850s were able to create the policy tools necessary to regulate Chinese immigration, but not Mexican immigration itself. Events following this split were consequential of the pathway that had already developed for the two groups so that the riots and laws against the Chinese between the 1860s and the early 20th century were not momentous--they were reproductions of the existing path. The path towards immigration regulation for the Chinese and Mexicans did not change again until 1924 when the gatekeeping ideology of the Chinese Exclusion Act was applied to Mexicans, resulting in a border patrol.
Statement of Responsibility: by Amy Staebler
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Tegtmeyer-Pak, Katherine

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 S7
System ID: NCFE003307:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003307/00001

Material Information

Title: Chinese and Mexicans The Development of Policy Tools for US Entry Control Policy, 1850-1920
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Staebler, Amy
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Chinese
Mexican
Gold Rush
Historical Institutionalism
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: The Chinese exclusion movement actually germinated from the pre-existing anti-Mexican movement in California, 1853 with the proposal of the Tingley Bill, suggesting that Chinese be forced to work like slaves in the mines. In 1853, this was an anti-Chinese movement, not a Chinese exclusion movement. The idea of exclusion as a policy option did not develop until 1855, when a special legislative committee considered exclusion and the American Party ran on the idea. After this split, the anti-Mexican movement never developed a conception of exclusion as a policy option: the anti-Mexican movements in California in the early 1850s were able to create the policy tools necessary to regulate Chinese immigration, but not Mexican immigration itself. Events following this split were consequential of the pathway that had already developed for the two groups so that the riots and laws against the Chinese between the 1860s and the early 20th century were not momentous--they were reproductions of the existing path. The path towards immigration regulation for the Chinese and Mexicans did not change again until 1924 when the gatekeeping ideology of the Chinese Exclusion Act was applied to Mexicans, resulting in a border patrol.
Statement of Responsibility: by Amy Staebler
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Tegtmeyer-Pak, Katherine

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 S7
System ID: NCFE003307:00001

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