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The Labour Party's Policy of Asymmetrical Devolution to Gain Scottish Electoral Support

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003291/00001

Material Information

Title: The Labour Party's Policy of Asymmetrical Devolution to Gain Scottish Electoral Support An Answer to Why Labour Devolved Differing Levels of Institutional Power to Wales and Scotland in 1999
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Roberts, Tina Marie
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Devolution
United Kingdom
British Politics
Scotland
Wales
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: In 1999, the Labour Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland established regional parliamentary bodies in Wales and Scotland that differ greatly from each other in terms of power. The Welsh Assembly does not possess the power to introduce primary legislation or to raise taxes. The Scottish Parliament, on the other hand, possesses the power to introduce primary legislation on social, economic, and home affairs, and the power to raise up to three pence on the basic rate of income tax. This thesis asks why two distinct parliamentary institutions with varying degrees of power were established in Wales and Scotland. Two explanations are considered: the historical approach, referred to as the national difference theory (NDT), and an analysis that considers the Labour Party's attempts to attract Scottish electoral votes in key general elections. The national difference theory is ultimately inadequate in answering this question, as it fails to consider the political power Wales and Scotland held during key general elections. This thesis demonstrates that the Labour Party advocated legislative devolution to Scotland, and not to Wales, to gain essential Scottish electoral votes in general elections, most significantly in the 1979 and 1997 elections.
Statement of Responsibility: by Tina Marie Roberts
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Tegtmeyer-Pak, Katherine

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 R6
System ID: NCFE003291:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003291/00001

Material Information

Title: The Labour Party's Policy of Asymmetrical Devolution to Gain Scottish Electoral Support An Answer to Why Labour Devolved Differing Levels of Institutional Power to Wales and Scotland in 1999
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Roberts, Tina Marie
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Devolution
United Kingdom
British Politics
Scotland
Wales
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: In 1999, the Labour Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland established regional parliamentary bodies in Wales and Scotland that differ greatly from each other in terms of power. The Welsh Assembly does not possess the power to introduce primary legislation or to raise taxes. The Scottish Parliament, on the other hand, possesses the power to introduce primary legislation on social, economic, and home affairs, and the power to raise up to three pence on the basic rate of income tax. This thesis asks why two distinct parliamentary institutions with varying degrees of power were established in Wales and Scotland. Two explanations are considered: the historical approach, referred to as the national difference theory (NDT), and an analysis that considers the Labour Party's attempts to attract Scottish electoral votes in key general elections. The national difference theory is ultimately inadequate in answering this question, as it fails to consider the political power Wales and Scotland held during key general elections. This thesis demonstrates that the Labour Party advocated legislative devolution to Scotland, and not to Wales, to gain essential Scottish electoral votes in general elections, most significantly in the 1979 and 1997 elections.
Statement of Responsibility: by Tina Marie Roberts
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Tegtmeyer-Pak, Katherine

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 R6
System ID: NCFE003291:00001

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