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Whistle Production Rates in a Group of Male Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops Truncatus) Over Changes in Composition

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003276/00001

Material Information

Title: Whistle Production Rates in a Group of Male Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops Truncatus) Over Changes in Composition
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Orth, Julia H.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Dolphins
Vocalizations
Whistles
Cetacea
Animal Behavior
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) are highly social animals with finetuned abilities in sound reception and production. Interesting aspects of their vocal behaviors such as signature whistles and vocal mimicry have been studied in detail. Little is known about their vocal behavior in general. Information such as normal vocal repertoire, or the conditions in which vocal behavior is most likely to occur, is absent from the literature. This study examines the whistle production rates of a group of male dolphins across changes in composition. One dolphin was present throughout the study. Whistle rates were analyzed before and after the death of one individual, following the introduction of another individual, after both animals were allowed mutual access, and following the introduction of yet another dolphin. Whistles were almost absent with one animal present and most common in the condition with three animals present. The latter effect seems to be partly attributable to the extensive vocalization rate of the newly introduced animal. These results suggest that there is individual variation in whistle production rate between individual animals and that dolphins are more likely to vocalize in the presence of conspecifics.
Statement of Responsibility: by Julia H. Orth
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Harley, Heidi

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 O7
System ID: NCFE003276:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003276/00001

Material Information

Title: Whistle Production Rates in a Group of Male Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops Truncatus) Over Changes in Composition
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Orth, Julia H.
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Dolphins
Vocalizations
Whistles
Cetacea
Animal Behavior
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) are highly social animals with finetuned abilities in sound reception and production. Interesting aspects of their vocal behaviors such as signature whistles and vocal mimicry have been studied in detail. Little is known about their vocal behavior in general. Information such as normal vocal repertoire, or the conditions in which vocal behavior is most likely to occur, is absent from the literature. This study examines the whistle production rates of a group of male dolphins across changes in composition. One dolphin was present throughout the study. Whistle rates were analyzed before and after the death of one individual, following the introduction of another individual, after both animals were allowed mutual access, and following the introduction of yet another dolphin. Whistles were almost absent with one animal present and most common in the condition with three animals present. The latter effect seems to be partly attributable to the extensive vocalization rate of the newly introduced animal. These results suggest that there is individual variation in whistle production rate between individual animals and that dolphins are more likely to vocalize in the presence of conspecifics.
Statement of Responsibility: by Julia H. Orth
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Harley, Heidi

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 O7
System ID: NCFE003276:00001

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