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An Overview of the Psychology and Biology of Schizophrenia

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003266/00001

Material Information

Title: An Overview of the Psychology and Biology of Schizophrenia
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Mintz, Rachel
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Schizophrenia
Biological Psychology
Dopamine Hypothesis
Abnormal Psychology
Brain Abnormalities
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Schizophrenia is an extremely complex mental illness that afflicts many people worldwide, and has multiple manifestations, and, most likely, multiple causes. Both genetic and environmental factors, such as birth complications and dietary issues, have been implicated as causes for this devastating illness. It is evident from the literature that both of them contribute to the development of schizophrenia. Hypotheses such as the dopamine hypothesis, glutamate hypothesis, and neurodevelopmental hypothesis all offer incomplete explanations of the causes and symptoms of schizophrenia. Many neurotransmitter systems, and how they work together, need to be investigated to create a better understanding of this illness, and to develop more effective medications with fewer side effects. Treatment techniques such as therapy, hospitalization, and medication, all have their own positive and negative consequences that need to be properly weighed in order to most effectively treat an individual with schizophrenia. Our understanding of schizophrenia would greatly benefit from future research. The development of more accurate animal models, inquiry into the effects of a new class of drugs called ampakines, studies on the effects of nicotine on dopamine and cognition, and possible protocadherin malfunction could shed some light on this intricate disease.
Statement of Responsibility: by Rachel Mintz
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Bauer, Gordon

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 M6
System ID: NCFE003266:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003266/00001

Material Information

Title: An Overview of the Psychology and Biology of Schizophrenia
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Mintz, Rachel
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Schizophrenia
Biological Psychology
Dopamine Hypothesis
Abnormal Psychology
Brain Abnormalities
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: Schizophrenia is an extremely complex mental illness that afflicts many people worldwide, and has multiple manifestations, and, most likely, multiple causes. Both genetic and environmental factors, such as birth complications and dietary issues, have been implicated as causes for this devastating illness. It is evident from the literature that both of them contribute to the development of schizophrenia. Hypotheses such as the dopamine hypothesis, glutamate hypothesis, and neurodevelopmental hypothesis all offer incomplete explanations of the causes and symptoms of schizophrenia. Many neurotransmitter systems, and how they work together, need to be investigated to create a better understanding of this illness, and to develop more effective medications with fewer side effects. Treatment techniques such as therapy, hospitalization, and medication, all have their own positive and negative consequences that need to be properly weighed in order to most effectively treat an individual with schizophrenia. Our understanding of schizophrenia would greatly benefit from future research. The development of more accurate animal models, inquiry into the effects of a new class of drugs called ampakines, studies on the effects of nicotine on dopamine and cognition, and possible protocadherin malfunction could shed some light on this intricate disease.
Statement of Responsibility: by Rachel Mintz
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Bauer, Gordon

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 M6
System ID: NCFE003266:00001

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