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We Build the Road and the Road Builds Us' An Exploration of Socially Engaged Buddhism

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003263/00001

Material Information

Title: We Build the Road and the Road Builds Us' An Exploration of Socially Engaged Buddhism
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: McDaniel, Jamie
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Buddhism
Social Service
Community Development
Political Activism
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis investigates the emergence of a new strain of Buddhist practice, termed 'Engaged Buddhism' which integrates political activism and social service with personal and community development, using the ethical and philosophical concepts of Buddhism as the foundation of its activities. The thesis explores the work of a selection of Buddhist social justice and community development organizations in Asia and the West. It considers the relationship of Engaged Buddhism to the larger Buddhist tradition, focusing in particular on the question of its compatibility with important Buddhist philosophical concepts such as the absence of self, impermanence and interdependence, and with key tenets of the Buddhist tradition such as the Five Precepts and the Four Noble Truths. This thesis attempts to answer three questions. First, is Engaged Buddhism a legitimate form of Buddhism? If so, what separates Engaged Buddhism from traditional forms of Buddhist practice? And finally, how does Engaged Buddhism conceive of and pursue the path to liberation? The thesis concludes that Engaged Buddhism does constitute a legitimate form of Buddhism, and that it can be distinguished from other variations of the Buddhist tradition by virtue of the motivation with which Engaged Buddhists pursue the path to liberation. Engaged Buddhists regard liberation, or nirvana, as a collective rather than personal affair, and view confronting the social causes of human suffering as beneficial both to the society at large and to the individual's development.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jamie McDaniel
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Newman, John

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 M13
System ID: NCFE003263:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003263/00001

Material Information

Title: We Build the Road and the Road Builds Us' An Exploration of Socially Engaged Buddhism
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: McDaniel, Jamie
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Buddhism
Social Service
Community Development
Political Activism
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis investigates the emergence of a new strain of Buddhist practice, termed 'Engaged Buddhism' which integrates political activism and social service with personal and community development, using the ethical and philosophical concepts of Buddhism as the foundation of its activities. The thesis explores the work of a selection of Buddhist social justice and community development organizations in Asia and the West. It considers the relationship of Engaged Buddhism to the larger Buddhist tradition, focusing in particular on the question of its compatibility with important Buddhist philosophical concepts such as the absence of self, impermanence and interdependence, and with key tenets of the Buddhist tradition such as the Five Precepts and the Four Noble Truths. This thesis attempts to answer three questions. First, is Engaged Buddhism a legitimate form of Buddhism? If so, what separates Engaged Buddhism from traditional forms of Buddhist practice? And finally, how does Engaged Buddhism conceive of and pursue the path to liberation? The thesis concludes that Engaged Buddhism does constitute a legitimate form of Buddhism, and that it can be distinguished from other variations of the Buddhist tradition by virtue of the motivation with which Engaged Buddhists pursue the path to liberation. Engaged Buddhists regard liberation, or nirvana, as a collective rather than personal affair, and view confronting the social causes of human suffering as beneficial both to the society at large and to the individual's development.
Statement of Responsibility: by Jamie McDaniel
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Newman, John

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 M13
System ID: NCFE003263:00001

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