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Olfaction, Memory and Emotion

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003246/00001

Material Information

Title: Olfaction, Memory and Emotion An Anatomical, Physiological, and Psychological Review of the Effects of Odors on the Human Brain
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Johannessen, Kristen Katherine
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Olfaction
Memory
Emotion
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: As microsmic mammals, humans do not rely as heavily on the sense of smell as they do on other sensory modalities. However, olfactory information can provide humans with vital information about the environment or food items. Olfaction is an evolutionarily old modality and the substrates that underlie olfactory processing may retain some of these more 'Primitive' elements. The anatomy of the olfactory system in humans is reviewed in light of the massive expansion of the frontal and temporal lobes in human brains. As an older cortical area, the primary olfactory cortex is less architectonically complicated than the neocortex of the cerebral hemispheres. This fact, along with its extensive ties to the hippocampal formation and subcortical 'limbic' structures allow the primary olfactory cortex to be easily studied and widely used as a model for circuitries elsewhere in the cortex. Hypothetical models of olfactory memory formation and function within these morphologies are discussed. Autobiographical olfactory memories are attributed with high levels of vividness and emotionality. This specific type of odor memory, along with more mundane aspects of olfactory memory are reviewed and discussed in light of current emotion and memory theories. Implicit and explicit aspects of olfactory memories are dealt with regarding functional neuroanatomy in humans and animal models. Laterality of olfactory processing is also discussed.
Statement of Responsibility: by Kristen Katherine Johannessen
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Beulig, Alfred

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 J6
System ID: NCFE003246:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003246/00001

Material Information

Title: Olfaction, Memory and Emotion An Anatomical, Physiological, and Psychological Review of the Effects of Odors on the Human Brain
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Johannessen, Kristen Katherine
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Olfaction
Memory
Emotion
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: As microsmic mammals, humans do not rely as heavily on the sense of smell as they do on other sensory modalities. However, olfactory information can provide humans with vital information about the environment or food items. Olfaction is an evolutionarily old modality and the substrates that underlie olfactory processing may retain some of these more 'Primitive' elements. The anatomy of the olfactory system in humans is reviewed in light of the massive expansion of the frontal and temporal lobes in human brains. As an older cortical area, the primary olfactory cortex is less architectonically complicated than the neocortex of the cerebral hemispheres. This fact, along with its extensive ties to the hippocampal formation and subcortical 'limbic' structures allow the primary olfactory cortex to be easily studied and widely used as a model for circuitries elsewhere in the cortex. Hypothetical models of olfactory memory formation and function within these morphologies are discussed. Autobiographical olfactory memories are attributed with high levels of vividness and emotionality. This specific type of odor memory, along with more mundane aspects of olfactory memory are reviewed and discussed in light of current emotion and memory theories. Implicit and explicit aspects of olfactory memories are dealt with regarding functional neuroanatomy in humans and animal models. Laterality of olfactory processing is also discussed.
Statement of Responsibility: by Kristen Katherine Johannessen
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Beulig, Alfred

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 J6
System ID: NCFE003246:00001

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