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Carnival Mirror Images

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003245/00001

Material Information

Title: Carnival Mirror Images The American Criminal as Protagonist in Capote's In Cold Blood, Highsmith's The Talented Mr. Ripley, and Nolan's Memento
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Jetton, Laura
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Crime
Literature
Protagonist
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: After the second World War, many American works about crime employ techniques that make the reader complicit with their criminal protagonists. Some of the ways in which this is done include the manipulation of suspense, point of view, and perspective. The authorial control over the amount of knowledge allowed the reader as well as the limited view of the world presented in the text or film both act to establish identification between the reader and the criminal protagonist. The three texts I chose to work with are significant because they divorce the reader from the protagonist after establishing a connection between the two. This is done through the challenge to identity: all three texts present identity as being nothing more than a role or performance, solely consisting of a sum of the superficial details and rituals of everyday life. Truman Capote's 'nonfiction novel' In Cold Blood (1965), Patricia Highsmith's novel The Talented Mr. Ripley (1955), and Christopher Nolan's film Memento (2001) all represent a movement within the genre of crime fiction toward a dissolution of the self, which extends to the structures of society. These texts demand active participation on the part of the reader; the ultimate divorce results in a questioning of their own complicity and their assumptions about the nature of identity.
Statement of Responsibility: by Laura Jetton
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Dimino, Andrea

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 J5
System ID: NCFE003245:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003245/00001

Material Information

Title: Carnival Mirror Images The American Criminal as Protagonist in Capote's In Cold Blood, Highsmith's The Talented Mr. Ripley, and Nolan's Memento
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Jetton, Laura
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Crime
Literature
Protagonist
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: After the second World War, many American works about crime employ techniques that make the reader complicit with their criminal protagonists. Some of the ways in which this is done include the manipulation of suspense, point of view, and perspective. The authorial control over the amount of knowledge allowed the reader as well as the limited view of the world presented in the text or film both act to establish identification between the reader and the criminal protagonist. The three texts I chose to work with are significant because they divorce the reader from the protagonist after establishing a connection between the two. This is done through the challenge to identity: all three texts present identity as being nothing more than a role or performance, solely consisting of a sum of the superficial details and rituals of everyday life. Truman Capote's 'nonfiction novel' In Cold Blood (1965), Patricia Highsmith's novel The Talented Mr. Ripley (1955), and Christopher Nolan's film Memento (2001) all represent a movement within the genre of crime fiction toward a dissolution of the self, which extends to the structures of society. These texts demand active participation on the part of the reader; the ultimate divorce results in a questioning of their own complicity and their assumptions about the nature of identity.
Statement of Responsibility: by Laura Jetton
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Dimino, Andrea

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 J5
System ID: NCFE003245:00001

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