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Body/Language in the Works of Jenny Saville, Mira Schor, Lesley Dill and Katie Helms

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003231/00001

Material Information

Title: Body/Language in the Works of Jenny Saville, Mira Schor, Lesley Dill and Katie Helms
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Helms, Katie
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Art History
Gender Studies
Fine Arts
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This project focuses on the work of Jenny Saville, Mira Schor, and Leslie Dill. These three body artists share a number of traits both in their ways of working and their use of language as visual image. In each case, the context of language is shifted from mind to body. All are informed by feminism and all are to some degree transgressive. Each artist employs discomfort to stimulate her viewer and incorporate his/her experience into the work. They all layer physical and linguistic experience to assert the influence that language has on our bodily existence. And all three emphasize their medium/materials to reiterate some bodily quality. Each artist inserts herself into the physical presence of the work either with selfportrait, mirrors, handwriting, or mark making. Saville, Schor, and Dill all use a dynamic combination of theoretical and artistic voices, which allows their work to respond to Elizabeth Grosz's call for a move towards corporeal feminism. Each of them critiques contemporary culture, resists the patriarchy, and transcends the category of body artist. In the final chapter I relate my own sculptural work to the work of these artists and discuss how they have influenced me both as an artist and as a feminist.
Statement of Responsibility: by Katie Helms
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Hassold, Cris

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 H4
System ID: NCFE003231:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003231/00001

Material Information

Title: Body/Language in the Works of Jenny Saville, Mira Schor, Lesley Dill and Katie Helms
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Helms, Katie
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Art History
Gender Studies
Fine Arts
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This project focuses on the work of Jenny Saville, Mira Schor, and Leslie Dill. These three body artists share a number of traits both in their ways of working and their use of language as visual image. In each case, the context of language is shifted from mind to body. All are informed by feminism and all are to some degree transgressive. Each artist employs discomfort to stimulate her viewer and incorporate his/her experience into the work. They all layer physical and linguistic experience to assert the influence that language has on our bodily existence. And all three emphasize their medium/materials to reiterate some bodily quality. Each artist inserts herself into the physical presence of the work either with selfportrait, mirrors, handwriting, or mark making. Saville, Schor, and Dill all use a dynamic combination of theoretical and artistic voices, which allows their work to respond to Elizabeth Grosz's call for a move towards corporeal feminism. Each of them critiques contemporary culture, resists the patriarchy, and transcends the category of body artist. In the final chapter I relate my own sculptural work to the work of these artists and discuss how they have influenced me both as an artist and as a feminist.
Statement of Responsibility: by Katie Helms
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Hassold, Cris

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 H4
System ID: NCFE003231:00001

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