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Brothers in Arms

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003219/00001

Material Information

Title: Brothers in Arms William Faulkner's Southern Family and the Fraternal Struggle for Progress
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Geer, Drew
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Faulkner, William
Brothers
Family
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis examines both biological and symbolic fraternal relationships within the familial communities of William FauUmer's fictional world. The families and family-like communities play a foremost problematic role in Faulkner's fraternal relations. Inevitably, these brothers are individually locked in a self-enclosed circle of the family. Each brother struggles to separate himself from the burdensome family. The problematic presence of the family represents the legacy of a racist patriarchal southern culture. Faulkner's brothers struggle to escape their fathers, who either commit incest or miscegenation -- which is culturally unacceptable in this racist system -- or are incompetent fathers. This emphasis on the paternal presence reveals the dominant role of the patriarch in the ideology of Faulkner's world. The brothers attempt to free themselves from the patriarch in order to come to terms with their own sociohistorical place within the South, which Faulkner situates between 1830 and 1940, a time period that envelops the plantation slavery system and its similarly divisive segregated aftermath. Faulkner's brothers attempt to achieve progress in this divided world. In the case of the Bundren and the Compson brothers in As I Lay Dying (1930), Flags in the Dust (1927), and The Sound and the Fury (1929), separated, biological brothers are not able to make any significant progress and fail to produce any historically effective change. In The Unvanquished (1938), Absalom, Absalom! (1936), and Intruder in the Dust (1948), symbolic brothers collaborate in order to challenge the patriarchal heritage. In Absalom, Absalom! and Go Down, Moses (1942), the fraternal relationships create twinships through narrative collaboration, which begins a gradual process of historically effective change by the inclusion of multiple narrative voices.
Statement of Responsibility: by Drew Geer
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Dimino, Andrea

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 G2
System ID: NCFE003219:00001

Permanent Link: http://ncf.sobek.ufl.edu/NCFE003219/00001

Material Information

Title: Brothers in Arms William Faulkner's Southern Family and the Fraternal Struggle for Progress
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Geer, Drew
Publisher: New College of Florida
Place of Publication: Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date: 2003
Publication Date: 2003

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Faulkner, William
Brothers
Family
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract: This thesis examines both biological and symbolic fraternal relationships within the familial communities of William FauUmer's fictional world. The families and family-like communities play a foremost problematic role in Faulkner's fraternal relations. Inevitably, these brothers are individually locked in a self-enclosed circle of the family. Each brother struggles to separate himself from the burdensome family. The problematic presence of the family represents the legacy of a racist patriarchal southern culture. Faulkner's brothers struggle to escape their fathers, who either commit incest or miscegenation -- which is culturally unacceptable in this racist system -- or are incompetent fathers. This emphasis on the paternal presence reveals the dominant role of the patriarch in the ideology of Faulkner's world. The brothers attempt to free themselves from the patriarch in order to come to terms with their own sociohistorical place within the South, which Faulkner situates between 1830 and 1940, a time period that envelops the plantation slavery system and its similarly divisive segregated aftermath. Faulkner's brothers attempt to achieve progress in this divided world. In the case of the Bundren and the Compson brothers in As I Lay Dying (1930), Flags in the Dust (1927), and The Sound and the Fury (1929), separated, biological brothers are not able to make any significant progress and fail to produce any historically effective change. In The Unvanquished (1938), Absalom, Absalom! (1936), and Intruder in the Dust (1948), symbolic brothers collaborate in order to challenge the patriarchal heritage. In Absalom, Absalom! and Go Down, Moses (1942), the fraternal relationships create twinships through narrative collaboration, which begins a gradual process of historically effective change by the inclusion of multiple narrative voices.
Statement of Responsibility: by Drew Geer
Thesis: Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2003
Electronic Access: RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Source of Description: This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
Local: Faculty Sponsor: Dimino, Andrea

Record Information

Source Institution: New College of Florida
Holding Location: New College of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
Classification: local - S.T. 2003 G2
System ID: NCFE003219:00001

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