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News Release (January 29, 1967)

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Material Information

Title:
News Release (January 29, 1967)
Alternate Title:
New College News Release, For Release: Sunday, January 29, 1967
Physical Description:
Book
Creator:
New College of Florida
Publisher:
New College of Florida
Place of Publication:
Sarasota, Fla.
Creation Date:
January 29, 1967

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
History -- New College (Sarasota, Fla.)
Planning -- New College (Sarasota, Fla.)
Records and correspondence -- New College (Sarasota, Fla.)
Genre:
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
News release
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Sarasota

Notes

General Note:
Three page news release.
Source of Description:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.

Record Information

Source Institution:
New College of Florida
Holding Location:
New College of Florida
Rights Management:
Before photographing or publishing quotations or excerpts from any materials, permission must be obtained from the New College Archives, and the holder of the copyright, if not New College of Florida.
System ID:
NCF0000588:00001


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Full Text

PAGE 1

COLLEGE NEWS RELEASE NEW COLLEGE, SARASOTA, FLORIDA FURMAN C ARTHUR INFORMATION FOR RELEASE: SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 1967 New College's first inauguration of a president has aroused much inter-est in the community and also a number of questions. The inauguration of President John Elmendorf, set for February 22 in the courtyard of the John and Hable Ringling Huseum of Art, will be the culmination of a six-month effort spearheaded by trustee Robert B. Van Skike Jr. "Since it is the first inauguration for the college, many people are ask-ing \-Jhy the college has waited so long to inaugurate a president, and \lhy is an in-auguration such an important affair," said Van Skike who heads the Inaugural Commit tee. The answer to the first question,he indicated, is simple. In the brief history of College, there has never been enough time, enough staff, and enoueh priority to schedule such an event. "An inauguration of a college president ordinarily takes at least a year of planning and work to make it successful," said Van Skike. "Additionally, it takes the cooperation of a vast number of faculty, staff and students. "In the three years that the college has had both faculty and students, we have ahays been concerned first that the college be placed on a sound academic footing. He now have reached the point \vhere this has been accomplished and \-Je can devote some attention to the traditional ceremonies that belong to an ongoing in-stitution. -more-

PAGE 2

NEH COLLEGE INAUGURATION Page 2 He said that the inauguration has importance to the college for many reasons. It is an academic tradition in tvhich the president is charged tith the duties of his office, Hhich are both solemn and tveighty, noted Van Skike. Since the function involves nearly everyone on campus, it is important since it is one of the feH occasions tvhen the whole academic community t-wrks together as a body tmvard one goal. "The inauguration also is a time when tTe can demonstrate to our local communities and to the larger public He serve that the college is making progress, that it is observing tradition," said Van Skike. "Like the inauguration of a governor or a president of the nation, it is a symbolic act of affirming the ongoing nature of the government, or in this case, the institution." Van Skike cited the numerous details that had to be attended to far in advance of such an occasion. Securing a speaker, in this case the British Ambassador to the United States, Sir Patrick Dean, had to be done in advance because of the commitments of such important figures. A list of institutions to be invited to send delegates had to be dra\m up from the several thousand colleges and universities all over the nation and the tvorld. Learned societies and professional associations had to be sent invitations to send representatives. -more-

PAGE 3

NEH COLLEGE INAUGURATION Paee 3 "All of this and the thousand other details of a normal inauguration are compounded by the fact that College has never inaugurated a president," said Van Skike. "At older institutions there are records of other ceremonials to give guides to future ones. He have no BUides and since He pride ourselves as being an innovative institution, ..;-Ie felt that l-Ie could not merely follow formulas set by other institutions." The museum courtyard chosen for the site of the occasion, Van Skike indicated, because of its beauty and appropriateness for the inauguration, but also because it can accommodate the several thousand guests expected to attend. Given good Heather, Van Skike said he felt that the NeH College inauguration Hould be one of the most beautiful ever held. "The beauty and formality of the Ringling Uuseum courtyard matches perfectly the atmosphere we believe should accompany the inauguration of the president of Ne\<7 College," he said. "He feel that the ceremonial, held in this beautiful setting, Hill be an occasion of great importance to the college, to the local t\vo-county community, and also to a great number of people across the land uho are Hatching the progress being made by Ne\<7 College. "The inauguration is as important, in its mm \my, as tvill be the graduation of our first class of students this summer. Each is a milestone, each is a sign of the stability He are increasinely achieving, and each Hill be part of the gr0\ing tradition of a ne\<7 college," concluded the inaugural chairman. -30-


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