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RESISTING CONFESSION IN TWO YOUNG ADULT NOVELS OF IMPRISONMENT

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Material Information

Title:
RESISTING CONFESSION IN TWO YOUNG ADULT NOVELS OF IMPRISONMENT
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Torres, Nicolas
Publisher:
New College of Florida
Place of Publication:
Sarasota, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Bachelor's ( B.A.)
Degree Grantor:
New College of Florida
Degree Divisions:
Humanities
Area of Concentration:
Literature
Faculty Sponsor:
Van Tuyl, Jocelyn

Subjects

Genre:
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, territorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
This thesis examines the use of literary techniques to resist confession in two realistic young adult novels of imprisonment written in the autobiographical mode. The imprisoned, teenaged protagonists in John Marsden’s Letters from the Inside (1991) and Walter Dean Myers’s Monster (1999) introduce fragmentation, doubling, and multiplicity into their autobiographical texts. Using Michel Foucault's description of disciplinary confession as well as his mapping of potential avenues for subverting this practice, this thesis shows how these tactics can be used to resist disciplinary power. In both novels, linear autobiographical narratives, which Foucault rightly situates within confessional discourse, are positioned as a tool that can be used to justify the imprisonment of a suspected pathological criminal. In Letters from the Inside, the imprisoned protagonist uses fragmentation and doubling to grapple with her ambivalent relationship to her culpability for her alleged crime. In Monster, the imprisoned protagonist uses multiplicity and fragmentation to produce an ambiguous confession that neither totally affirms nor denies his culpability. Moreover, the degree to which each protagonist strives to trouble the practices of disciplinary confession is directly correlated to their own sense of culpability for the crimes of which they have been accused. Both novels delineate potential avenues through which confession, including modes like autobiography and memoir, can be used to investigate and critique disciplinary power.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Nicolas Torres
Thesis:
Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2014
General Note:
RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
General Note:
Faculty Sponsor: Van Tuyl, Jocelyn

Record Information

Source Institution:
New College of Florida
Holding Location:
New College of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
S.T. 2014 T6
System ID:
AA00024821:00001

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