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THE MONSTER WITHIN AND WITHOUT: IDENTITY ASSIGNMENT AND CONSTRUCTION IN SLAVE NARRATIVES AND HORROR FICTION

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Material Information

Title:
THE MONSTER WITHIN AND WITHOUT: IDENTITY ASSIGNMENT AND CONSTRUCTION IN SLAVE NARRATIVES AND HORROR FICTION
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Lucas, Chelsey
Publisher:
New College of Florida
Place of Publication:
Sarasota, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Bachelor's ( B.A.)
Degree Grantor:
New College of Florida
Degree Divisions:
Humanities
Area of Concentration:
English
Faculty Sponsor:
Dimino, Andrea
Wallace, Miriam

Subjects

Genre:
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, territorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
This thesis presents an analysis of the relation between the human and the monster as it is used in nineteenth-century American slave narratives (Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs) and British and American horror fiction (Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Glen Duncan’s Last Werewolf trilogy). I begin with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818), asserting that Victor Frankenstein attempts to abject his own monstrousness through the creation of his monster. The creature tries to discover his nature in relation to human persons, and acquires language and literacy. Through this, he becomes a recognizable person despite his physical deformity, at least for the reader. He remains ostracized and rejected by his father/creator, however, demonstrating a distinct split between monster and human, and also the transcendence of these categories when Victor becomes monstrous and the creature becomes recognizably human-like. In the next chapter, I use Frederick Douglass’s Narrative (1845) and Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861) to demonstrate how both write their own stories to claim their own humanity and readerly sympathy. Under slavery, black-bodied individuals were perceived and represented as less-than-human. In slave narratives that detail slavery’s atrocities, however, the slavemaster is perceived and depicted as monstrous. Finally, Glen Duncan’s The Last Werewolf trilogy (2011; 2012; 2014) shows the monster and the human existing in a single body. Protagonists Jake and Talulla depict a dual identity as human and “wulf,” while their babies, born werewolves, represent a hybridization between the two formerly distinct categories. This thesis challenges the notion that human and monster are distinct categories with monster theory, deconstruction, and gender theory, and questions where the line is drawn if it ought to be drawn at all.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Chelsey Lucas
Thesis:
Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2014
General Note:
RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
General Note:
Faculty Sponsor: Dimino, Andrea; Wallace, Miriam

Record Information

Source Institution:
New College of Florida
Holding Location:
New College of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
S.T. 2014 L8
System ID:
AA00024765:00001

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