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DOES FRUSTRATION EXPLAIN THE AGGRESSIVE CONSEQUENCES OF VIDEOGAMES?

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Material Information

Title:
DOES FRUSTRATION EXPLAIN THE AGGRESSIVE CONSEQUENCES OF VIDEOGAMES?
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Lane, Daniel Joseph
Publisher:
New College of Florida
Place of Publication:
Sarasota, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Bachelor's ( B.A.)
Degree Grantor:
New College of Florida
Degree Divisions:
Social Sciences
Area of Concentration:
Psychology
Faculty Sponsor:
Cottrell, Catherine

Subjects

Genre:
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, territorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Videogames have become a major part of the average person’s life. As such, a lot of psychological research has been conducted on the effects of videogames, particularly violent videogames. The vast majority of this research agrees that playing violent videogames tends to make a person more aggressive. When explaining these consequences, the research tends to focus on one of two ideas. Either researchers think that the violence itself causes higher aggression, or researchers believe that violent games are more competitive than non-violent games, and that competition causes higher aggression. However, other possible explanations should be considered. This study proposes that violent videogames are more frustrating, and that frustration causes aggression. To test this, participants played one of four videogames that varied in violence (low or high) and frustration (low or high). After playing the games for 15 minutes, participants completed the Competitive Reaction Time Task, a measure of aggression in which participants send an unpleasant sound at a supposed opponent. Participants control the intensity and duration of the sound; louder and longer sounds are considered more aggressive. The results failed to show the expected link between violent games and aggression entirely. There was no main effect of either violence or frustration, nor was there an interaction between the two variables. The most likely reason for this is that the implementation of the aggression measure was flawed in the current study, although other possibilities exist and will be discussed.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Daniel Joseph Lane
Thesis:
Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2014
General Note:
RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
General Note:
Faculty Sponsor: Cottrell, Catherine

Record Information

Source Institution:
New College of Florida
Holding Location:
New College of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Classification:
S.T. 2014 L3
System ID:
AA00024761:00001

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