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PURSUIT, PUNISHMENT, AND PERVERSION: VARIATION IN OVID’S METAMORPHOSES

Material Information

Title:
PURSUIT, PUNISHMENT, AND PERVERSION: VARIATION IN OVID’S METAMORPHOSES
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Frost, Ashley
Publisher:
New College of Florida
Place of Publication:
Sarasota, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Bachelor's ( B.A.)
Degree Grantor:
New College of Florida
Degree Divisions:
Humanities
Area of Concentration:
Literature
Faculty Sponsor:
Rohrbacher, David

Subjects

Genre:
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, territorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Ovid’s Metamorphoses compiles more than 250 Greek and Roman myths. This thesis seeks to explain how the poet differentiates tales that share the same theme through close analysis of both the Latin text and an English translation. I show that Ovid individuates myths by controlling how his reader perceives and responds to each tale. In chapter one, which discusses myths that share the theme of unrequited love, including Apollo and Daphne, Pan and Syrinx, Acis, Galatea and Polypehmus, and Glaucis and Scylla, Ovid manipulates every such tale to encompass some degree of humor, either undercutting or compounding the threat of rape in each. In chapter two, which discusses myths that feature vengeful gods punishing mortals, including that of Niobe, Marsyas, Arachne, and Actaeon, Ovid ascribes various levels of culpability to the transgressions of the mortals, leading the reader to either condemn or sympathize with the character’s plights. In chapter three, which discusses nontraditional or perverse love myths, including that of Iphis and Ianthe, Pygmalion, Byblis, and Myrrha, Ovid prompts the reader to respond to the characters and their passions with either sympathy or repulsion by manipulating the aspects of a tale that he chooses to focus on. Ovid carefully narrates well known myths in a variety of tones and through a variety of authorial focuses, allowing Ovid the poet and his active presence within the narrative to stand preeminent among the legendary stories that he compiles.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Ashley Frost
Thesis:
Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2014
General Note:
RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
General Note:
Faculty Sponsor: Rohrbacher, David

Record Information

Source Institution:
New College of Florida
Holding Location:
New College of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Resource Identifier:
Classification:
S.T. 2014 F76
System ID:
AA00024741:00001

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