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YOU DON'T LOOK SICK: THE INFLUENCE OF PERCEIVED STIGMA AND IDENTITY CENTRALITY ON DISCLOSURE DECISION MAKING IN PEOPLE W...

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Material Information

Title:
YOU DON'T LOOK SICK: THE INFLUENCE OF PERCEIVED STIGMA AND IDENTITY CENTRALITY ON DISCLOSURE DECISION MAKING IN PEOPLE WITH INVISIBLE ILLNESSES
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Fischer, Alexis Haley Echo
Publisher:
New College of Florida
Place of Publication:
Sarasota, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Bachelor's ( B.A.)
Degree Grantor:
New College of Florida
Degree Divisions:
Social Sciences
Area of Concentration:
Psychology
Faculty Sponsor:
Cottrell, Catherine

Subjects

Genre:
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, territorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an umbrella term for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis: two chronic, concealable physical illnesses. The nature of the diseases' symptoms and unknown cause of the diseases make them stigmatized conditions. Fear of stigma and resulting consequences can drive people to conceal their disease from others. However, disease can be included as part of the self concept, and according to self verification theory, the more central the disease is to a person's identity, the more likely it is that they will disclose their disease to others in order to get support and validation. Seventy seven people with IBD took online surveys regarding the centrality of their disease to their identity, their disclosure status, and perceived stigma levels from a number of social groups. Results show increased perceived stigma is predictive of lessened disclosure for significant others, friends, bosses and supervisors, and coworkers and classmates. Identity centrality is predictive of disclosure to significant others, friends, and bosses. Perceived stigma and identity centrality interact to predict disclosure to significant others and friends, such that people of low and moderate disease centrality disclose less when they anticipate more stigma and people of high disease centrality show no relationship between stigma and disclosure. This research allows researchers to better understand the impact of having a stigmatized invisible illness on identity and when people with an invisible illness deem it important to present that identity to others.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Alexis Haley Echo Fischer
Thesis:
Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2014
General Note:
RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
General Note:
Faculty Sponsor: Cottrell, Catherine

Record Information

Source Institution:
New College of Florida
Holding Location:
New College of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Resource Identifier:
Classification:
S.T. 2014 F57
System ID:
AA00024738:00001

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