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LOCALIZATION OF WALL ASSOCIATED KINASES (WAKS) DURING GRAVITY STIMULATION IN B73 ZEA MAYS L. PULVINUS

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Material Information

Title:
LOCALIZATION OF WALL ASSOCIATED KINASES (WAKS) DURING GRAVITY STIMULATION IN B73 ZEA MAYS L. PULVINUS
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Eilbert, Emily
Publisher:
New College of Florida
Place of Publication:
Sarasota, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Bachelor's ( B.A.)
Degree Grantor:
New College of Florida
Degree Divisions:
Natural Sciences
Area of Concentration:
Biology
Faculty Sponsor:
Clore, Amy

Subjects

Genre:
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, territorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Wall Associated Kinases (WAKs) are recently discovered Receptor-Like Kinases (RLKs), but their function has proven to be key to plant survival. WAKs are integral plasma membrane proteins with an intracellular serine and threonine kinase domain and the extracellular domain contains Epidermal Growth Factor-like (EGF-like) repeats. WAKs have been found to bind both whole and fragmented strands of pectin, and they are able to distinguish between the two to initiate developmental and defense responses respectively. Furthermore there are multiple types of WAKs which may have different functions. Five WAK genes and isoforms have been found so far in Arabidopsis. WAKs are involved in cell expansion, cell wall biogenesis, and stress responses. Given their involvement in cell expansion and potential role in signaling cascades, I investigated if WAKs were involved in gravitropic cell expansion. Gravity stimulation of a plant stem causes it to bend at approximately a right angle towards the initial vertical position. This response is necessary for survival, and in order for the bending to occur the relative lower half of the stem (closest to the ground after reorientation) must elongate. In Zea mays L., this growth is specific to small disc shaped sections of tissue termed pulvini, which become wedged shaped after gravity stimulation. As an initial step toward testing the potential role of WAKs in maize gravitropism, I imaged WAKs, potential pectin ligands,and microtubules to determine localization patterns in gravity stimulated B73 maize using immunofluorescence. WAK localization indeed changed in the pulvinus tissue during gravity stimulation, suggesting that WAKs are involved in the gravity stimulated response. In addition, there appeared to be partial overlap of signal between the WAKs and microtubules as well as between WAKs and esterified pectin in particular, although confocal microscopy will be necessary for verification.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Emily Eilbert
Thesis:
Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2014
General Note:
RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
General Note:
Faculty Sponsor: Clore, Amy

Record Information

Source Institution:
New College of Florida
Holding Location:
New College of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Resource Identifier:
Classification:
S.T. 2014 E3
System ID:
AA00024735:00001

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