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ALLELOPATHIC EFFECTS OF CRUDE AND PURIFIED COMMON RAGWEED (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) ROOT EXTRACTS ON THE INVASIVE BRA...

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Material Information

Title:
ALLELOPATHIC EFFECTS OF CRUDE AND PURIFIED COMMON RAGWEED (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) ROOT EXTRACTS ON THE INVASIVE BRAZILIAN PEPPER (Schinus terebinthifolia Raddi) AND SEVERAL FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SPECIES
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Binninger, Sean
Publisher:
New College of Florida
Place of Publication:
Sarasota, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Bachelor's ( B.A.)
Degree Grantor:
New College of Florida
Degree Divisions:
Natural Sciences
Area of Concentration:
Biology
Faculty Sponsor:
McCord, Elzie

Subjects

Genre:
bibliography   ( marcgt )
theses   ( marcgt )
government publication (state, provincial, territorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
born-digital   ( sobekcm )
Electronic Thesis or Dissertation

Notes

Abstract:
Ambrosia artemisiifolia (common ragweed) is a widespread native throughout North America and is invasive in Europe and Asia. Therefore, it has the potential to affect many habitats and plant communities. Its allelopathic effects were studied to help determine its environmental impacts. Previous experimental protocol showed thiarubrine A from root extracts negatively affects plant growth. Therefore, a crude root extract was applied to Schinus terebinthifolia (Brazilian pepper), Aeschynomene americana (shyleaf), Solidago stricta (wand goldenrod), Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry), and Symphyotrichum dumosum (rice button aster) seeds. A purified root extract, obtained by liquid-liquid extraction and column chromatography, was applied to Brazilian pepper and shyleaf seeds. The effects of herbicide treatments (bromacil, diuron, and hexazinone) were compared to those of the crude extract. Germination rate, seedling elongation, and seedling biomass were examined to determine treatment effects.Methanol and the purified extract caused significantly lower germination rates than water or the crude extract with shyleaf and significantly reduced Brazilian pepper and shyleaf seedling elongation compared to water. Methanol showed greater negative effects on growth than expected, while the crude extract had less of a negative effect on germination and biomass than expected. Bromacil and hexazinone were much more growth-inhibiting than the crude extract.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Sean Binninger
Thesis:
Thesis (B.A.) -- New College of Florida, 2014
General Note:
RESTRICTED TO NCF STUDENTS, STAFF, FACULTY, AND ON-CAMPUS USE
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
This bibliographic record is available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication. The New College of Florida Libraries, as creator of this bibliographic record, has waived all rights to it worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law.
General Note:
Faculty Sponsor: McCord, Elzie

Record Information

Source Institution:
New College of Florida
Holding Location:
New College of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
Resource Identifier:
Classification:
S.T. 2014 B5
System ID:
AA00024717:00001

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